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Thread: Glunz & Jensen PlateWriter 2000

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    Craig's Avatar
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    Default Glunz & Jensen PlateWriter 2000

    Does anyone have any feedback on this platemaker? I have received plate samples from them today which look real nice. Our pressman has not run them yet, but I can't see too many problems from the looks of them. I have heard about nozzle clogs but the salesman said they have that solved on the 2000 with different nozzle configurations. We are a small shop using a Xante Platemaker and would like to move back to metal plates since we are getting more runs with trap registration, and the thin Xante poly plates stretch during the run. The $30,000 price point makes it a hard option not to look at.

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    hello - Ive had experience running one of these machines - only ran one for a few months as ive since left that employer - For the money its not a bad machine. We had the same problem with the polyester plates, with them stretching and screens not coming out so hot. The platewriter 2000 is a good concept, and any other metal plate maker can double or triple its price. The only downfalls i could say about are the following.... Screen values and line screens are hard to match from stuff you already printed or customer samples you are trying to match for color in screens. The liquid dot technology doesnt create screens like a laser does. They print excellent, Ive seen a 4pt font show up as a knockout in a black solid without filling in. They do take a while (not sure how big of a plate your trying to image) We used it for a Ryobi 3302 (small plates) and by the time the software ripped the file, printed on the plate, and you cured and gummed the plate - which is all automated - it seemed like it could sometimes take 20 minutes to get a plate to the press - thats not bad if you plan ahead, but if theres an error on press and you need a new plate then you have downtime - remember it only prints as fast as an inkjet printer does. The only other downfall is if the machine breaks down, I dont believe they have service techs in every state, and you may need to wait a day or 2 for service - ask your sales rep how they account for this if your machine goes down. Overall the quality of the printed image is fairly impressive though....let me know what you think of your test print

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    Craig's Avatar
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    Thanks for the feedback, that's just the sort of information I was looking for. Our plates are 13x19.625 for an ABD 9870. I can understand the difference in the screen, but how far off were they from traditional screens on re-prints? Would the average customer even notice?

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    I'm not sure if someone would notice, I would imagine that it depends on the color and the tint value - also im sure the presses give different results as well

    I think they could, If your using paper plates now, and you switch to metal, chances are your metal plates will be more accurate in relation to screens. The paper plates could be not accurate as of now and your client doesnt even know it.

    You should see if your sales rep will make you a plate for a job you have in house, or maybe someone in the area has this machine. Perhaps you can have a plate made for a job you get a lot of repeat orders on and see if there is a color difference - this may be the only way to find out.

    Also - Did you get a detailed list of the costs for maintaining this machine?? If I remember correctly, the liquid dot cartridge thats used for these machines is like $200-$300 - I could be way off, and dont know how many plates you can produce on average from a cartridge.

    I'm not saying the machine is a bad machine, but considering its a metal plate CTP for on ly $30,000 - You do kinda get what you pay for, but then again a real Metal CTP can be anywhere from $80,000 +

    Just try to look at your pros and cons

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    Craig's Avatar
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    I am also going to look at something used and re-built, we just don't produce enough plates to justify 80,000 bucks and we don't print any 4 color process on the press.

    I am open to other ideas, even poly. I'll be going to Graph Expo to see what's available for small 2 up shops.

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    bgardner is offline Member
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    Keep us up to date, Like I said its not an awful machine. But I know where I worked we were a small 3-5 man shop, and everytime we had to order a cartridge, A few hundred bucks seems like a big hit

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    Craig's Avatar
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    Sounds like my shop size. I'll drop a post when I find more out.

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    sreese01 is offline Junior Member
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    Hi Craig, I'm always happy to hear someone with a Xante Platemaker. How long have you had your platemaker for your 9870? We have added quite a few CTP options to our lineup, probably since you've had your platemaker, and all way under 80,000. Would you like me to have a rep contact you for more details?
    Kind Regards
    Scott Reese
    SVP Sales, Xante
    (251) 473-6502

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    iCtP is offline Junior Member
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    Default From the horses mouth..

    [QUOTE=bgardner;94360]hello - Ive had experience running one of these machines - only ran one for a few months as ive since left that employer - For the money its not a bad machine. We had the same problem with the polyester plates, with them stretching and screens not coming out so hot. The platewriter 2000 is a good concept, and any other metal plate maker can double or triple its price. The only downfalls i could say about are the following.... Screen values and line screens are hard to match from stuff you already printed or customer samples you are trying to match for color in screens.

    Hi bgardner,
    The latest version of the PlateWriter2000, come with additional calibration curves making it much easier to match existing output right out of the box. However, as it is based upon a Harlequin RIP, you can make your own curve based upon what you previously printed (right or wrong), and get it to match. (For this you need to use a densitometer).

    [QUOTE=bgardner;94360] The liquid dot technology doesnt create screens like a laser does. They print excellent, Ive seen a 4pt font show up as a knockout in a black solid without filling in. They do take a while (not sure how big of a plate your trying to image) We used it for a Ryobi 3302 (small plates) and by the time the software ripped the file, printed on the plate, and you cured and gummed the plate - which is all automated - it seemed like it could sometimes take 20 minutes to get a plate to the press - thats not bad if you plan ahead,

    Hmmm..... Think you may have used the previous first generation model the PW4200 in your previosu company? This was quite slow, the PW2000, is second generation, and we have just release the MK2 software (Free for all existing users), this updates the finishing unit and RIP, the finishing unit is now over twice the speed, and printing a plate takes as long as the amount of image you have on it... (plus finishing) anything from 4mins - 8mins (for 100% coverage). So, I am guessing you had the older model...PW4200.


    By the way, I saw some one ask how many plates the thing made......

    There is a WhitePaper available which shows typical jobs, and gives an indication of cost per plate... (or how many plates your carts do), but for typical work you can reckon on around 700plates, but low coverage envelope printers etc could do as many as 2000 ?

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    Cool CTP questions

    I have seen the iCTP and I have a customer that has one. It is a good idea but I would consider it low end. It's slow and registration is a problem. First of all the Epson is a capstan device and with all capstan devices they are not as accurate as a drum device. Epsons were not designed to run plates, the capstan assembly is not heavy duty enough and the heads clog, no matter what the manufacturers say. If you were running 4 or 8 plates a day and were doing 1 and 2 color junk work I would say do it. If you are a quality shop with any volume save your self a big headache.

    For $30,000 you can get several "high end" used CTPs such as a DPX Polyester CTP and a Cobalt Violet CTP. Used Lotems and Pressteks thermals are in that range, and maybe even an old Trendsetter. Now if you want to spend a little more you can move up to a Used Screen CTP as well.

    You get what you pay for...
    VladCanada likes this.


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