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  • Kimosetter 410

    Hello everyone,

    I am in the process of puchasing (actually leasing) a computer to plate system. I have looked at Xanté and I am currently reviewing the Kimosetter 410.

    I would like to ask if anyone is using the Kimosetter. I have looked at the prices of the machines and the Kimosetter is much less for a "new" machine (about $2000) but is it worth the money saved?

    Also does anyone know which machine uses more consumables? The specs I have on both seem to show almost identical run lengths and all that jaz.

    I have also read on the specs that the Kimo can make a much larger plate than the Xanté machine.
    The Xanté in question is the Platemaker 5. I have three presses; two of which run the same size plate and one that runs a slightly larger plate. Has anyone ran plates and cut them down to size? Or do you have to order them precut like you would a normal metal?

    I'm sure I will have some more questions that just are not coming right now, but any suggestions/help on this matter is appreciated. Thank you for your time.

    Dustin
    4-State Printing
    Columbus, Kansas

  • #2
    Re: Kimosetter 410

    The Kimosetter uses ribons that only make a few plates, and then you have to put a new one in. The Platemaker 5 only needs the imaging unit (Toner) which will give you about 3000 plates in normal use. It is rated for 15000, but that 5% on 8.5 x 11 rating is not real world use. The poly plate on the Platemaker can be cut for a smaller press, or you can just use a smaller poly plate for that size. The Patemaker also has calibration and distortion ajustment features that the Kimosetter doesn't have. If your work is not requiring the highe line screens or higher quality, the lower initial cost may be your best bet. In the long term, the Platemaker would be less money.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Kimosetter 410

      Dustin, I have a kimo 340 and use it a lot (the only difference between it and 410 is max plate size). I evaluated the xante and the kimo before purchasing the kimo. I sent test files to Xante and they sent me test plates (twice). Both times they were out of register (it was a simple two color job). They told me it was a software issue. I had a test plate printed on a kimo and it was dead on. So I went with kimo.

      Good points about kimo, its affordable, puts out decent plates (ok screens), good registration (max 106lpi I believe). Also, being poly plates you CAN cut the plates down. We run a lot of business cards, and we cut down a 10x15 plate into 3 strips that are 5x10 which is 3 plates for a 4 up strip of business cards. We also cut down a 10x15 plate into 5x15 for #10 or #9 envelope runs. All you need is a 1/16th or so plate beyond the edge of the stock to run an item. We tack the plate down to the cylinder with spray adhesive or simply a glue stick. :-) I have a normal paper cutter I got at office max sitting next to my kimo which I use to cut down 75% of the plates we print out. (like I said we print a lot of business cards). We dont even clamp most of the plates on the press, simply the spray adhesive, however, most of our runs are short (eg 125-3000). If you have larger runs, especially 2 color, you may want to have a full plate to clamp it down so it does not move on you. We primarily print business cards, letterhead and envelopes (1-2 color, occasionally 3 color)

      The plates are one sided so you can only use one side, you can test print on the back side though if you are curious how something looks on the plate prior to output on the good side of the plate.


      Some of the bad points, I have had software issues, but I am on a Mac platform. They have made good improvements in the last year to the RIP for Mac, but its not 100%. If you are on a PC you may not have any software issues, as all the other kimo users I know are PC and they have no issues software wise. Other bad points, service for me has not been good. They do not have enough service techs to support the equipment. I have purchased several pieces of new equipment in the last year and the kimo service has been down right poor compared to the others.

      I had the kimo for about 10 months, put about 100 plates through it every 5-7 days, and it shot craps at 10 months. It took them 3-4 days to send me a replacement unit, and then I sent mine in for repair. Dont know about you but I had jobs to put out, so I had to buy a HP5000 printer the same day and put out laser plates to keep jobs on the press. It was less than ideal but I had no choice. Again, not the greatest service.

      About service, although I do not have a xante platemaker, I do have a xante digital press, ilumina. I do not recommend the unit as a color digital unit (overpriced consumables compared to a copier/production unit), however, their service is good. They call me back the same day, and when my printer broke and they could not trouble shoot it, a service guy showed up 2 days later and fixed the printer.

      How are your pressroom conditions? In the summer, ours is horrible, no ac, very hot and humid. Under those conditions, some of our plates would go bad. The image would simply come off the plate (especially if there was a screen). The rest of the year, usually no problems. We can get 7-8000 impressions easy off a plate, we have had higher. We have also had lower and had to put out several plates for short run jobs, but at about a $1 a plate its not that big of deal.

      My main pressman ran metal exclusively for 14+ years until I had him switch to poly. He now loves poly and hates metal. He can register a job much quicker.

      Consumables, I use primarily 10x15 plates ( approx $95 per box from xpedx), one box of ribbons lasts me about 4-500 plates. Presstek sells offbrand plates and ribbons for about $10 less than kimo but I have not tested them. Valley litho also sells kimo products, and will offer discount if you purchase in qty.

      You are only about 3-4 hrs drive, if you want to come see the unit in action or on press, let me know and come on up. We will give you first hand experience.


      Aaron
      right choice
      operations@rightchoicepublising.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Kimosetter 410

        Aaron:

        I just read your post about the Kimoplate. I too am considering a Kimosetter 410 and have been trying to get user input. I just ran about 12 test plates on a job, 2500 run each. What I found interesting is that the first 6 plates ran beautiful, screens, halftones and text, sharp and crisp the whole run. (11x17, 20# bond sheets) I was very excited and ready to call the dealer and buy the machine. When I started backing up the sheets the remaining 6 plates started breaking down at about 1000 to 1500 impressions. My conclusion is that the spray powder I ran on the first side must have worked its way off the sheet to the blanket, then contaminating the plate. Have you experienced this? (I did not run an excessive amount.) I would very much like to purchase this machine. If this is a common "known" issue, then at least I know not to use any spray powder on the first side of a run. I've also tested the xante lazer plates (both samples from xante and the genie brand for my HP5000) and had no luck there at all. They imaged nice but seemed to run very dry and break down very fast. I tried different fountain solutions and reset all my roller pressures, but they were not for me.

        I too am using a Mac and will need the Mac rip. Have you ever thought of, or heard of anyone using something like virtual pc or VMware Fusion on the mac to get around paying the extra $ for the Mac rip? I don't know it it would work, but I'd like to try it.

        Thanks for your help!

        theinkman@aol.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Hello Inkman!

          we ran kimo plates everyday about 2/3 in 2 colors on our ABD9985 and did not experience any problem. we do not even use fountain solution. it weakens our image anad with just plain tap water we can go up to 20,000 on these runs! good to the environment too. good luck!

          Comment


          • #6
            Purchasing a Kimosetter

            I would like to know if anyone knows of a Kimosetter Distributor near Seattle, WA. I have been looking to purchase a Kimosetter, however I have not been able to find a distributor near me. I have also contact the main website for Kimo Tech and they have not gotten back to me either. I am hoping someone will be able to guide me the right way.

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm the saler of kimosetter410 and 340i in China.In China most of the print cpmpany think the cost is very expensive I feel very confused.How shoud I do?How to sell the kimo's?

              Comment

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