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Canada hits back at U.S. with dollar-for-dollar tariffs

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  • Canada hits back at U.S. with dollar-for-dollar tariffs

    Hosers in Canaduh fight back with tariffs of their own on US goods.

    Here's a partial list of targeted US goods:
    Maple Syrup
    Yogourt
    Pizza and quiche
    Strawberry jam
    Soya sauce
    Prepared mustard
    Hair lacquers
    Manicure or pedicure preparations
    Automatic dishwasher detergents
    Toilet paper
    Handkerchiefs
    Playing cards
    Ball point pens

    That'll learn you Yankees that you can't beat us Cheeseheads! Bwa-ha-ha!

  • #2
    WAIT! "Toilet Paper"? That's just not right!

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    • #3
      Gordo that is something to be proud of for sure.

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      • #4
        *sarcasm font*at least we don't have a crooked president*/sarcasm font*

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        • #5
          Trudeau is a totally honest and respectable man. No backdoor deals or insider information being passed to his friends.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by MailGuru View Post
            WAIT! "Toilet Paper"? That's just not right!
            That’s right! We show no mercy. Sorry.

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            • #7
              Mass produced toilet paper, three ply with the little nubbins, is in my humble opinion one of mankind´s greatest inventions, to deny it to somebody is a crime against humanity.

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              • #8
                Some explanation. ---> http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/stee...aper-1.4686833
                "you never know how the past is going to turn out"

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                • #9
                  US is putting tariffs on hard goods while the rest of the world is putting tariffs on food and other disposable items. I think that shows the strength of the US negotiating position. Not saying I'm for or against any of this, just an observation.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JustinB View Post
                    US is putting tariffs on hard goods while the rest of the world is putting tariffs on food and other disposable items. I think that shows the strength of the US negotiating position. Not saying I'm for or against any of this, just an observation.
                    These are tactical choices being made by the EU and Canada. They are designed to hurt the citizens of the States that supported Trump. I think the idea is that by hurting those States gives leverage to Congress to stop this trade war insanity.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JustinB View Post
                      US is putting tariffs on hard goods while the rest of the world is putting tariffs on food and other disposable items. I think that shows the strength of the US negotiating position. Not saying I'm for or against any of this, just an observation.
                      But raw material tariffs hurt US manufacturing and the end users of those products; where consumer good tariffs by Canada only hurts end users in their respective countries.

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                      • #12
                        Canada has every reason to remain in NAFTA. The U.S., not so much. Trudeau has one last hope of staying in it, but he's not doing his country any favors with his current approach.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by arossetti View Post

                          But raw material tariffs hurt US manufacturing and the end users of those products; where consumer good tariffs by Canada only hurts end users in their respective countries.
                          I'm not convinced. I think it HELPS US manufacturing of those raw materials. Will there be an adjustment period: sure. Will the US be just fine with out Canadian aluminum: yep. Canada, however, may feel far more long term pain from shuttered mills that devastate entire regions. (Think rustbelt in the 70's and 80's where it takes decades to recover from losing an industry.) Canada has what? 36 million residents. The US has nearly 10 times that. I read the above listed article and understand its logic but I'm not sure I would be afraid of their tariffs on finished products.

                          Did anyone else notice that Trump announced 50 billion in tariffs on China, then North Korea suddenly wanted to negotiate and make peace, then the US quietly backed down from the 50 billion in tariffs?

                          Fascinating to see how all of this will play out.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JustinB View Post

                            I'm not convinced. I think it HELPS US manufacturing of those raw materials. Will there be an adjustment period: sure. Will the US be just fine with out Canadian aluminum: yep.
                            Maybe not.

                            (From an article linked below)

                            Key to understanding the counterproductive nature of this move, say industry watchers, is the inherent Canadian advantage bestowed by its abundant hydroelectric resources.

                            Aluminum is made from bauxite, a raw material Canada has very little of (almost half of the world's reserves are in Guinea or Australia).

                            The other main input is electricity. Canada — especially Quebec — produces a lot of cheap hydro.

                            U.S. electricity rates are much higher. The price differential for this critical input far outweighs the cost of a 10 per cent tariff.

                            That's why U.S. industry buys half of its aluminum from Canada — nearly four times as much as it buys from its own producers.

                            The 14 U.S. aluminum smelters are typically older, smaller, and less cost-efficient than their counterparts in Canada, not to mention the ones in China and Russia. More than half of them are either closed or operating well below capacity.

                            Just one Canadian smelter — Aluminerie Alouette Inc. in Sept-Iles, Que. — comes close to equalling the entire output of the U.S. aluminum industry.

                            Jorge Vasquez of Harbor Aluminum, Austin, Texas. "The U.S. needs Canadian production." (Harbor Aluminum)
                            "This is not going to make the U.S. smelting industry more competitive. Not even artificially competitive," Vasquez told CBC News.

                            "The U.S. is going to lose more jobs than it gains. No question about it."

                            Full article here:

                            http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/cana...riff-1.4686655
                            Last edited by gordo; 06-01-2018, 11:27 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Obama once announced that U.S. energy prices will necessarily sky-rocket, as he initiated policies toward subsidizing alternative energies and adding regulations to hamper traditional energy sectors. Enter a new administration, new policies, and energy costs may not be the obstacle they were in the past. If ever there was a country that could turn an industry around, anyone would be hard pressed to deny that of the U.S. So we'll see.

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