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  • Photoshop instead of RIP

    Hi there, I do a bunch of printing but it doesn't warrant me forking out thousands on a RIP just yet. I have used Qimage but I'm not getting great results with my colours. I'm wondering if anybody has any experience using Photoshop to print large jobs? I get great results from Photoshop but it means I need to open each image print manually. I think I can set an automation and run that as a batch but it won't account for placing placing image on a sheet of paper together, for instance 4 A4 images on 24" roll.

    Does anybody have any experience with this and know if it's possible set Photoshop up to run in a similar way to Qimage?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Surprisingly you can use Photoshop as a RIP as long as your imager eats Tiff´s, even seperations are possible, at least it was waaay back in the heady days of the 90ties. DCS was not too shabby if I remember.

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    • #3
      What kind of files are you printing? Please don't say PDF's!
      Joe
      OS: Mac OS X 10.10.2 - RIP: Prinergy Connect 6.1 - CTP: Luscher XPose! 160 (2)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Joe View Post
        What kind of files are you printing? Please don't say PDF's!
        They're all jpegs.

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        • #5
          What kind of printing?

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          • #6
            Ah, looks like short run, large format inkjet fine art reproductions. Is that right? If that's the case, it sound like it might be imposition software you need more than a RIP.

            I think people might have assumed offset litho or screenprinting, and using Photoshop to generate final, 1-bit separations.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Danny Whitehead View Post
              Ah, looks like short run, large format inkjet fine art reproductions. Is that right? If that's the case, it sound like it might be imposition software you need more than a RIP.

              I think people might have assumed offset litho or screenprinting, and using Photoshop to generate final, 1-bit separations.
              That's the stuff yeah, just standard wide format inkjet printing. The easiest way I've had is to just use the Epson drivers but you have little control over colour. Photoshop is great but you can only do one image at a time and all positioning is manual. Qimage is becoming a hasstle and I'm not getting the right results with colour but the facility to auto-space things on the roll of paper is great.

              I've had a look at things like Onyx work for what I need but they all cost a total bomb. I don't know what imposition software is. Is there anything you can recommend?

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              • #8
                I don't understand your workflow completely.

                How do you or how would you linearize your printer?

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                • #9
                  I'm not really au fait with imposition for wide format, but I'm sure there's plenty of folk here who are. Sounds like your other issue is colour management. Do you have anything in place in that regard - custom media profiles, conversion policies and the like?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Danny Whitehead View Post
                    I'm not really au fait with imposition for wide format, but I'm sure there's plenty of folk here who are. Sounds like your other issue is colour management. Do you have anything in place in that regard - custom media profiles, conversion policies and the like?
                    I create my own profiles with i1profiler and my X-Rite basic pro 2. The profiles I have created work well within Photoshop so I know they are fine, they just aren't working so great in Qimage, though I am requesting assistance through their forums. Just hoping someone knows of another approach. From what google told me about impositioning that seems to be what I need, a method to use colour profiles and automatically imposition on a roll of paper.

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                    • #11
                      You could look into Mirage for a “lite” solution:

                      http://mirage.dinax.de/New_Features.html

                      For Mac users, there is FitPlot:

                      http://www.fitplot.it

                      While at the higher end there is Griffin from Tilia Labs:

                      http://tilialabs.com/griffin.html

                      And I hate to mention it, however a WUNDES Illustrator script can very roughly “lay out” placed images, then you could tidy up the edge alignment for trimming etc:

                      http://www.wundes.com/JS4AI/distribu...kedObjects.jsx


                      However I would personally recommend a “proper” wide format RIP, as hacks cost money in the long run.



                      Stephen Marsh
                      Last edited by Stephen Marsh; 04-20-2017, 05:19 AM.
                      Comments are personal and my views may not be shared by my employer or partners.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Danny Whitehead View Post
                        Ah, looks like short run, large format inkjet fine art reproductions. Is that right? If that's the case, it sound like it might be imposition software you need more than a RIP.

                        I think people might have assumed offset litho or screenprinting, and using Photoshop to generate final, 1-bit separations.
                        Yes, that was my first thought, dunno, has anybody tried using PS as a RIP this side of the 21st century?

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                        • #13
                          I vaguely remember such practices in the 90s, but couldn't remember how it was done, so I couldn't resist trying. I opened a PDF in PS at 1200ppi, duplicated each channel to a grayscale document, changed the mode to bitmap, halftone, 150lpi and assigned the angles, duped them back into a CMYK file. The results were surprisingly sort of OK. I expected it to soften the edges of vectors, but it didn't.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Danny Whitehead View Post
                            I vaguely remember such practices in the 90s, but couldn't remember how it was done, so I couldn't resist trying. I opened a PDF in PS at 1200ppi, duplicated each channel to a grayscale document, changed the mode to bitmap, halftone, 150lpi and assigned the angles, duped them back into a CMYK file. The results were surprisingly sort of OK. I expected it to soften the edges of vectors, but it didn't.
                            Just opening the PDF in PS would have rasterized all of your text and vectors but at 1200 dpi would still look fairly sharp. Then you lose the soft edge when you convert to bitmap.
                            Joe
                            OS: Mac OS X 10.10.2 - RIP: Prinergy Connect 6.1 - CTP: Luscher XPose! 160 (2)

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                            • #15
                              Yeah, I expected the converting to halftone bitmap step to do what the 'colour halftone' filter does - make a bunch of round dots with no regard for the edges. It actually keeps the edges like an actual RIP does.

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