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  • Need help on canvas printers to start a business

    Please assist me on choosing a canvas printer which produces high quality prints and does not cost much, you can advice on the quality of print, size of print, cost, ink and maintainance, and any info that would help, thank you

  • #2
    Most comments will suggest a fine art printer with 6 or more colors, my advise for Canvas is go for a Mutoh 1624 works with us better than HP Z6100 and Latex, more durable printer and less cost.

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    • #3
      I will suggest an Epson 7900 Large Format Printer. I have a friend who use it and he is very satisfied. What is your budget?

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      • #4
        If you looking at aqueous, for the least amount of trouble, nozzle clogs and so forth go Canon iPF Pros. That being said I do all most all my canvas of the HP Latex because it does not need to be coated like the aqueous printers.

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        • #5
          I really depends on how much canvas and size(s) you're going to be printing. Latex/Solvent is a cheaper option, but you're going into a larger model vs aqueous that has 17, 24, 44 and 60/64" models. Feel free to contact our company as we carry aqueous, latex and solvent models and will provide the options available.

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          • #6
            What type of coating would you apply to an aqueous printer like HP Z5600?

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            • #7
              Coatings for aqueous? That's news to me. We've done tons of aqueous canvas without the need for any coatings. Do you mean treated canvas?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gregbatch View Post
                Coatings for aqueous? That's news to me. We've done tons of aqueous canvas without the need for any coatings. Do you mean treated canvas?
                Maybe? We're quite new to this segment of the industry to be honest.

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                • #9
                  Yeah, I'm sure he was referring to pre-treatment to accept aqueous ink rather than a finish coating. I was confused when I first read it - not enough coffee in the bloodstream yet. Yes, aqueous canvas is more expensive. About 50 cents sqft.

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                  • #10
                    Most aqueous canvas is already good to print on. If you find a non aqueous coated canvas, you'll need that coating to print on it (like the HP Z5600). But there are probably a bit more canvas options vs solvent/latex available. Some brands can get a pretty low cost (not as low as solvent/latex), but pretty decent compared to manufacturers that make it.

                    We do carry many types of canvas. Let us know if you're looking for something particular or have questions.

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                    • #11
                      I'm actively looking for a new wide format printer as well. Mainly to provide my clients a wider variety of options than my Canon 8400s offers. Canvas is one of them and that is how I stumbled across this discussion. So I too have a few related thoughts and questions. First, regarding canvas prints, I'm getting mixed messages. Aqueous requires a varnish for protection but I'm being told or it's been suggested that Eco-solvent requires or benefits from a varnish as well. Can this be supported or am I being fed a line? Second question. I'm leaning toward Eco-solvent. I see Epson, Mutoh and Mimaki often mentioned in the forums. But rarely Oce or Roland.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BuffLam View Post
                        I'm actively looking for a new wide format printer as well. Mainly to provide my clients a wider variety of options than my Canon 8400s offers. Canvas is one of them and that is how I stumbled across this discussion. So I too have a few related thoughts and questions. First, regarding canvas prints, I'm getting mixed messages. Aqueous requires a varnish for protection but I'm being told or it's been suggested that Eco-solvent requires or benefits from a varnish as well. Can this be supported or am I being fed a line? Second question. I'm leaning toward Eco-solvent. I see Epson, Mutoh and Mimaki often mentioned in the forums. But rarely Oce or Roland.
                        Yes, for any durability Aqueous requires a varnish/over-lam for protection. Eco-solvet probably not. HP Latex defiantly not. But if you use canvas the is coated for aqueous printer in the Eco-solvet or Latex you will need to varnish/over-lam just protect that delicate aqueous coating. If you use canvas made for solvent printers then you don't really need to varnish.

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                        • #13
                          I have never had to coat aqueous canvas. If it is good quality canvas with proper treatment you shouldn't need anything.

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                          • #14
                            If you want to play the game you can send out your canvas uncoated on an aqueous printer and risk the customer coming back for their money back because the inks rubbed off or the inks faded. The proper way to finish a canvas off an aqueous printer is to coat the canvas. Breathing Color says if you print on their Gloss canvas that you don't need to coat it. In small print beneath that they have a disclaimer saying that you should coat the canvas. That's the facts and that's what the manufacturers all reccommend to do including the printer manufacturers. Aqueous printers are the least expensive machinery to get into but the printing medias are more costly as well as the inks.

                            Some people go with Eco Solvent and Latex printers for canvas because the inks are rated to be outside for 3 years without fading and resistant to the weather as well. The beauty of these ink technologies is that you don't need to coat the canvas. This is what large canvas printing companies utilize for their printer fleets because of the workflow snag coating aqueous canvas causes, the cost of the material and inks is much lower with Eco Solvent and Latex (20% on ink and 40% on media) and faster print speeds.

                            Gregbatch is right, most people don't coat on aqueous canvas, but the ones that do have been burned in the past and understand the risk at hand when printing on aqueous canvas with aqueous printers. It has nothing to do with the canvas or it's coating, sure, it helps hide the real issue at hand which is the ink technology. There is a lot of false information out there so be weary of what you read on forums. Everyone is an expert when there is a keyboard in front of them.

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                            • #15
                              The reason you should always coat aqueous-printed canvas is that all aqueous media receive ink into a "receptor coat" that is bonded to the surface of the media. The receptor coat has to be there in order to 'receive' the aqueous ink. The inclusion of the receptor coat is also why aqueous media costs more than latex/solvent media.

                              As some have said, you can get away without coating aqueous canvas prints, but if you do, that means for the life of that print, the receptor coat on that print is still going to be open, and receiving. Not a good idea if you're truly serious about your product.

                              And if you are truly serious, the best printer for printing canvas there has ever been is the Canon iPFx400 series. It's out of production now but if you want to try and find a used one, you can for not much money.

                              Next up quality-wise I'd go with the current aqueous Epson Sure Color.

                              If you don't want to go aqueous, the absolute hands-down canvas winner currently among commercial-grade latex/solvent printers is the Epson S80600. After that, the HP solvents actually print very well, but they do have serious gamut limitations compared to the Epson.



                              Mike Adams
                              Correct Color


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