Apple M1computer

metromike

Member
Just wonder what folks are moving to when upgrading their Macs
We have been iMac 27 users since 09 but it is time to upgrade a gain but the M1 is not used in the 27.
The 24 is a bit small sThince we are used 27 and the Mac mini may not be robust enough even though it does have the M1. Mac Pro is way too expensive for our budget.
 

scotts

Well-known member
We have not upgraded our iMacs either. But will in the couple of years if not earlier. But everyone is working with a secondary display. So if Apple hasn't updated the iMacs to have 27" displays, than we just buy and make our secondary displays 27" instead. And use those as our primary display. Not the best solution, but would work.
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
We moved to M1 Mac Mini's last spring - moved from 2010 Mac Pros (well spec'ed).
They are wayyyyyy faster than the Pros on MOST things - payed for themselves quickly.
Just get plenty of ram. ;-)
And you can run multiple monitors no sweat. Three cheers for USB C.
Be ready to add USB C Peripheral connections.
And when you upgrade the cpu the monitor rides along :) as ours did since we replaced them the year before.
 
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metromike

Member
We moved to M1 Mac Mini's last spring - moved from 2010 Mac Pros (well spec'ed).
They are wayyyyyy faster than the Pros on MOST things - payed for themselves quickly.
Just get plenty of ram. ;-)
And you can run multiple monitors no sweat. Three cheers for USB C.
Be ready to add USB C Peripheral connections.
And when you upgrade the cpu the monitor rides along :) as ours did since we replaced them the year before.
Looks like the Mac Mini only goes up to 16 Gb of RAM, how is that working for you running Adobe apps?
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
Looks like the Mac Mini only goes up to 16 Gb of RAM, how is that working for you running Adobe apps?
Ah, you peeked.
All good here. Same as we had with our old Pros.
You'll note Apple changed that when they went to the M1 - still able to configure to 64G on the Intel mini machines.
They're trying to keep from cannabalizing the iMac sales.
- don't get me started on the ADO$#@$$E products.
:mad:
 

jrhmobile

Active member
Just wonder what folks are moving to when upgrading their Macs
We have been iMac 27 users since 09 but it is time to upgrade a gain but the M1 is not used in the 27.
The 24 is a bit small sThince we are used 27 and the Mac mini may not be robust enough even though it does have the M1. Mac Pro is way too expensive for our budget.
I wouldn't buy into the M1 Macs.

Apple is already upgrading the specification to M1+ and M2 chips, both options are expected to offer the RAM really needed to push lots of work through a busy shop, and if you go to the Adobe User Forums, you won't have to go halfway down the first page to see M1 Mac owners raging at how these systems don't run as well as their old systems did.

If you're running a production shop, you don't want to be sliding down the bleeding edge with the first models of Apple's new Silicon hardware upgrades. Especially when substantially upgraded systems are but a few months away. If I were you, I'd keep the powder dry and be prepared to pull the trigger on later systems which have the bugs ironed out of them and can pull the workload print pros see day in and day out.
 

bobtucker

Member
They make three processors in the M1 family, M1, M1 Pro, and M1 Max. I believe that the M1 Pro and M1 Max are only available in the new Mac Book Pro. I'm holding out for a 27" iMac with the m1 Max chip (10-core CPU & 32-Core GPU), I heard summer of 2022. That is going to be a good day!
 

jdodoubleg

Active member
I love my macbook pro M1. I've had it for about a year now. I run 2 32" monitors through a thunderbolt dock. I've got 16gb ram. Just remember, get all the ram you are ever going to need, I don't think you can upgrade ram on these new macs, as the ram is on the chip or the board at least. Not sure about all of them though.
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
I wouldn't buy into the M1 Macs.

Apple is already upgrading the specification to M1+ and M2 chips, both options are expected to offer the RAM really needed to push lots of work through a busy shop, and if you go to the Adobe User Forums, you won't have to go halfway down the first page to see M1 Mac owners raging at how these systems don't run as well as their old systems did.

If you're running a production shop, you don't want to be sliding down the bleeding edge with the first models of Apple's new Silicon hardware upgrades. Especially when substantially upgraded systems are but a few months away. If I were you, I'd keep the powder dry and be prepared to pull the trigger on later systems which have the bugs ironed out of them and can pull the workload print pros see day in and day out.
Adobe loves them some complaining Mac users.
But the complainers about Adobe products? Not so much.
The User Forums routinely delete what the overlords deem unacceptable.
We aren't having problems in a production environment, but it would always be nice to have the latest greatest.
M1+ or M1 Pro would be awesome in a mini but Apple may be slow to release them.
I think we can put them in the budget for 2023 with any luck.
 

Puch

Well-known member
I work on an M1 mini (16 GB of RAM) in a production environment from last spring. No problems, even with multiple Adobe applications running concurrently. I mean processing a batch of images in Photoshop with a script, while doing layout work in InDesign. On the other hand, the computer might be quick, but the software companies are even quicker to add unnecessary functions, making the apps bloated. So, the overall experience is a moderate step forward, very far from the 'revolution' Apple advertised.

I just had to switch on an old PowerMac today (running MacOS 8.6) and I was quite impressed how snappy that 25 years old machine is, even by today's standards.
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
I just had to switch on an old PowerMac today (running MacOS 8.6) and I was quite impressed how snappy that 25 years old machine is, even by today's standards.
Agreed. Everything was optimized because it HAD to be. Sigh.
Although between the really slow networking and the OS or Apps locking up for no reason I think I'll pass.
:)
 

joshlindsay

Well-known member
I love my macbook pro M1. I've had it for about a year now. I run 2 32" monitors through a thunderbolt dock. I've got 16gb ram. Just remember, get all the ram you are ever going to need, I don't think you can upgrade ram on these new macs, as the ram is on the chip or the board at least. Not sure about all of them though.
I also have a Macbook Pro M1 and it's a beast. Adobe software doesn't seem to have the performance gains that the OS feels like bit it's no worse than my old Hackintosh and certainly usable.

Dual 32" you say... What dock did you go with? I changed to a 34" Ultra-wide as I couldn't get dual external screens to work.
 

prepressdork

Well-known member
I purchased an M1 iMac (with 16GB of memory) and so far, I've not seen any performance issues with anything (including Adobe apps).

Best regards,
pd
 

kslight

Well-known member
My Intel iMac was on the way out and we needed to upgrade, to me the m1 was the sensible option (wasn’t going to invest in Intel Macs and building a PC is overpriced and some components are hard to get these days). I got the “best” m1 mini available at the time. It runs great, had a few hiccups early on before Adobe updated Indesign and such but no problems anymore. I also got a Asus Pro Art 27” 4k usb c display. Zero regrets. I would have liked to have waited for an m2 or whatever but my iMac said otherwise.

With any computer purchase I’d recommend the best that the budget allows for to hope for the longest usable life…you can’t upgrade the ram or internal storage on these to my knowledge.
 

jdodoubleg

Active member
I also have a Macbook Pro M1 and it's a beast. Adobe software doesn't seem to have the performance gains that the OS feels like bit it's no worse than my old Hackintosh and certainly usable.

Dual 32" you say... What dock did you go with? I changed to a 34" Ultra-wide as I couldn't get dual external screens to work.
Yea, so I am using 2 docks. One of them is a dell and the other is the OWC Thunderbolt 4 dock. I have one monitor plugged into the dell and the dell is plugged into the OWC and both monitors work. Not at full 4K mind you, but that resolution would be too small for me anyways. I have one running at 2560x1440 and the other at 2048x1152 and I also still have the ability to use the attached screen as well.
 

PricelineNegotiator

Well-known member
I wouldn't buy into the M1 Macs.

Apple is already upgrading the specification to M1+ and M2 chips, both options are expected to offer the RAM really needed to push lots of work through a busy shop, and if you go to the Adobe User Forums, you won't have to go halfway down the first page to see M1 Mac owners raging at how these systems don't run as well as their old systems did.

If you're running a production shop, you don't want to be sliding down the bleeding edge with the first models of Apple's new Silicon hardware upgrades. Especially when substantially upgraded systems are but a few months away. If I were you, I'd keep the powder dry and be prepared to pull the trigger on later systems which have the bugs ironed out of them and can pull the workload print pros see day in and day out.
I agree with this statement, but will be firm to say that the M1 Air/Pro/Mini are great bargains for professionals and casual users. The iMacs recently released are not worth the money, and would hold out for "M2" iMacs (perhaps Pro models) that will probably come out in a few months. My M1 Macbook Air is an absolutely amazing machine and puts high end desktop configurations to shame. The only downside is that I can connect only 1 display to my Air, whereas I would prefer the capability of connecting 3 or more. However much memory you need in your current computer is overkill in an M1 Mac. If you needed 16 GB, you could easily get by with 8 GB. Closer proximity to the CPU and high bandwidth memory will do wonders, much akin to HDD -> SSD upgrades. SOC and less SKU's will be the future of laptop and desktop systems once we get Windows ported over to ARM/RISC-V (I hear Apple is also pursuing moving from RISC to RISC-V btw).
 

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