Customer stealing eProof files

auchprinting

Active member
We do a lot of prep work, and supply a PDF eProof. On occasion, I will do all the work, submit an eProof, and the customer takes the job somewhere else. Is there a way to protect myself? I would hate to supply paper Proofs.
 

M@CK

Well-known member
I dealt with this my self, the only way I found was to make it into a picture (raster) with low resolution. Password protection is no good, way to easy to circumvent.
Watermarking is an other alternative, but only works for raster.
 

chevalier

Well-known member
If your workflow has a JPEG/PNG export option use it and don't send PDFs as proofs. If a customer is determined to get a PDF route that PNG/JPEG to a process to make it into a PDF.
 

zombie

Well-known member
Since it is an eProof, I suppose it is used for text and layout check ONLY, before proofing it in your house, to see how colours looks like.
I have had such customers like you are talking about. All I did was to auto convert all colours to RGB using Pitstop Pro, and sent them the file.
 

Stephen Marsh

Well-known member
Since it is an eProof, I suppose it is used for text and layout check ONLY, before proofing it in your house, to see how colours looks like.
I have had such customers like you are talking about. All I did was to auto convert all colours to RGB using Pitstop Pro, and sent them the file.

One can go even further with their PitStop Pro/Server action list:

* Leave text as is, rasterise all other content to low resolution RGB

* Convert all text to outlines, rasterise all other content to low resolution RGB

* Convert everything to low resolution RGB rasters

* In addition to the previous options, add a watermark

I too would suggest that a web based proofing solution that does not deliver the final high resolution asset is a good option, as well as providing version control, markups, approvals etc. There are stand alone solutions or solutions integrated into various vendor’s workflow software or MIS/W2P etc.


Stephen Marsh
 
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rich apollo

Well-known member
I always send low-rez RGB files for PDF proofs. I have a PDF export setting that I use if I'm designing. If I'm working in production, I will use a "normal" PDF export and process the file in Acrobat to make it suitable for proofing and emailing.
 

zombie

Well-known member
I always send low-rez RGB files for PDF proofs. I have a PDF export setting that I use if I'm designing. If I'm working in production, I will use a "normal" PDF export and process the file in Acrobat to make it suitable for proofing and emailing.

There are cases when few (dumb) customers insist to receive a Hi-Res PDF.
 

dabob

Well-known member
There are cases when few (dumb) customers insist to receive a Hi-Res PDF.

Yes but then bury a 500 meg photo in the job and output a no do not down sample pdf and email them a ginormus pdf . . . if it goes through their mail server it will screw up their day . . .
 

rich apollo

Well-known member
There are cases when few (dumb) customers insist to receive a Hi-Res PDF.

Typically, the production PDFs are too large to email conveniently. If they're going to be like that, then you're going to have to change up your billing. Make sure that you're getting paid for all prepress work, and instead of billing (or not billing) for a PDF proof, charge them for delivery of final files.

If they're saying that they are going to print with you, and then they're snagging the files and cancelling the print order, the pricing needs to reflect that. The prepress work can be billed at a reduced rate tied to the volume of the job. If the print order is cancelled, or reduced, then the prepress charges escalate.

Another option is to charge them a non-refundable portion of the job up front, before any work is done on their files.

I don't know how a large a portion of your business this client represents. Whether or not you can survive without them greatly effects how aggressive you might be.
 
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davarino

Well-known member
Send low rez proofs. If they insist on pdf, proof as a low rez jpg and then make it a pdf for them.

If they want a really detailed output for proof, it's time to ask for money because they are asking for reproduction quality art, which by trade custom is not part of the bargain unless otherwise specified in your working arrangement with the customer.
 

slush11

Well-known member
Since it is an eProof, I suppose it is used for text and layout check ONLY, before proofing it in your house, to see how colours looks like.
I have had such customers like you are talking about. All I did was to auto convert all colours to RGB using Pitstop Pro, and sent them the file.

I've always proofed with raster but I'm curious to know why you all convert to RGB first? Just for online viewability?
 

zombie

Well-known member
I've always proofed with raster but I'm curious to know why you all convert to RGB first? Just for online viewability?

It's a protection method. This way I am sure that my work on his files will not be printed outside my shop. If he pay for the prepress work I did on his files, then is fine for me, I give him the correct document.
 

zombie

Well-known member
Yes but then bury a 500 meg photo in the job and output a no do not down sample pdf and email them a ginormus pdf . . . if it goes through their mail server it will screw up their day . . .

Well, first of all, such a file will not pass my email server :)
Second, ppl. are not stupid, there are a lot of servers where you can upload a 1 Gb brochure.
 

WiseGuy

Well-known member
Just to chime in on another alternative, with our product Connect ALL you can make a single use application (called a Connector) that will either take an existing PDF or generate a new PDF and automatically turn off (restrict) printing, add a watermark (via a Pitstop Action list), and down-res the file, or make it all RBG (again via Action Lists).

With Connect, you could make this Application and give it to all your internal users and all they would need to do is drag and drop a file on the app and the Connector would generate the Customer safe version that could be sent to them.

Plus, there's much more you could do with Connect (controlled PDF creation, preflight, job ticketing, file delivery) since you can define and create as many Connectors as you want for internal use (like this) or external use with your clients.

Just an alternative to be aware of.

Michael Reiher
Product Manager, Enfocus
 

slush11

Well-known member
I don't know what keeps happening to my comments but they keep disappearing. So I'm sorry if this shows up twice. Can anyone explain why you convert to RGB before proofing? I always rasterize a proof but I've never bothered with converting to RGB first. Is it just for online viewability?
 

Saulius

Active member
I don't know what keeps happening to my comments but they keep disappearing. So I'm sorry if this shows up twice. Can anyone explain why you convert to RGB before proofing? I always rasterize a proof but I've never bothered with converting to RGB first. Is it just for online viewability?

i guess to distort a colors intentionally. Because you could not recreate precisely original CMYK.
 

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