Gigabit Ethernet switch

Mark

Well-known member
We are looking to finally upgrade to Gigabit Ethernet. What is the best unmanaged auto sensing switch out there? (24 port) I'd like to keep it under $500.
Thanks
 

Sev

Well-known member
We use a Cisco SRW2024 Gigabit unmanaged switch with WebView, and have been very happy with it.
It is right around $275 on Amazon.

-Sev
 

TF019

Member
Netgear

Netgear

We purchased 2 Netgear 24 port switches. JGS524. Chained them together and they have run flawlessly for over 2 years. Newegg has them for $189 with rebate. We paid around $250 each when we purchased them. For that price you can buy 2 and get ready for network expansion. Best of luck.
 

mattbeals

Well-known member
With switches you have to keep in mind how much backplane traffic (switch fabric) they support. A cheap switch with a small backplane isn't going to to do you much good. Otherwise you'll run into traffic jams and slow connections. The problem with a switch like the JGS524 is that the way you expand the switch is to use the uplink port to connect to a second switch. It would be preferable to use a different kind of connection, one that connects the backplanes together. The way this switch works now is all the traffic going to the other switch has to go through one port. That will slow things down. However it can be mitigated if you put 10mb or 100Mb clients on the other switch to isolate traffic in a way so you don't have as much of a problem with gigabit clients.
 

pcmodem

Registered Users
We have 2 Cisco/Linksys SLM2048 Switches, 1 Cisco/Linksys SRW2048, and a 48 port 3Com SuperStack 3. They are all Daisy chained together.

We have problems with network speed. Specifically when someone is coping large amounts of files from network server A and I am on network server B.

Does any one have any suggestions?
 

mattbeals

Well-known member
You have four 48 port switches, or 192 ports? How many are active? Can you consolidate traffic on any of them? Since you have the SLM2048's can you use the GBIC's to uplink to each other? The SRW2048 isn't quite the same class as the SLM2048, so I'm not quite sure what to do there. But I'd do what I can to get rid of the 3Com from the mix. Try and keep your servers, RIP's and prep stations on the two SLM's and put everything else on the SRW.

Really what you need is a switch like the HP ProCurve 4200vl modulars switch: HP ProCurve Switch 4200vl Series

It's got a good sized back plane, you can shape the traffic on the switch to isolate high i/o functions/workstations/severs and expand down the road.

Forget the SO/HO switches and the hodge podge method, do it once the right way. It will pay for itself in the end. It seems like a lot for a switch, but you get what you pay for.
 

pcmodem

Registered Users
We have about 150 of the ports active and majority of the traffic is isolated to each switch. From what I have read, the only difference between the SLM and the SRW, is the SRW has 4 GBIC's and the SLM has 2. I thought using the GBIC was only good if the distance between the switches was a long distance away. What benefit does using the miniGBIC provide?

Would having a Core Switch help us?

What about having a router on the internal network?

Why should we go wtih HP instead of Cisco, Foundry Networks(now Brocade), or Juniper Networks?
 

macdevin

Well-known member
We have about 150 of the ports active and majority of the traffic is isolated to each switch. From what I have read, the only difference between the SLM and the SRW, is the SRW has 4 GBIC's and the SLM has 2. I thought using the GBIC was only good if the distance between the switches was a long distance away. What benefit does using the miniGBIC provide?

Would having a Core Switch help us?

What about having a router on the internal network?

Why should we go wtih HP instead of Cisco, Foundry Networks(now Brocade), or Juniper Networks?

The MiniGbic is just an empty slot that is rated up 1 Gig. It can take different kinds of transceivers that give it a whole range of cabling types from short range all the way up to very long distance.

As far a a core switch is concerned. Most shops do not need them, but it helps to know the entire scope of everything. A core switch is mainly needed in large /or complex networks.

What do you need to route? Most layer3 switch's will do what you need.

I stay away from HP..... Cisco is overpriced for their switches, love their routers. (Thats all I have)... Foundry Networks makes some great stuff, but never used them. I myself only use Extreme Networks switch's. They are layer3 and can handle just about anything you throw at them.
 

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