HOW CAN I SAVE PDF FILE ?l

dabob

Well-known member
File - Save As . . . .????

A little more info on what the issue is would probably help.
 

Possumgal

Well-known member
I don't know what program you're using, but try Save As and see if PDF is an option. If not, try Export. If you can't make a PDF directly from your program, try saving as an EPS and then using Distiller to make your PDF. Ask your printer what settings he wants to use.

If your program won't save as a PDF and you don't have Distiller, you are pretty out of luck. In fact, if your program won't save a file as a PDF, your document probably isn't suitable for printing anyway, as you are using a program not made to produce printable output.
 

BumpFlash

Member
From your attachment, you seem to be using Photoshop, looking at the [Press Quality] Preset in the "Save Adobe PDF" dialog.
I'm sure everyone here has dealt with many a PDF that was worse than what you'll get by clicking through the default settings you see there. However, Possumgal's advice is best: ask your printer what settings they want you to use. They have probably seen enough bad PDFs that they will love you for asking.
 

Simon Ivarsson

Well-known member
Im just guessing here...
Did someone complain that you sent them an image and told you that they want a pdf?
Well... saving an image from photoshop won't do any good.
Use photoshop for images and Illustrator / indesign for the rest.
For single page document, always use Illustrator
 

Dov Isaacs

Well-known member
… For single page document, always use Illustrator
I would strongly dispute that generalization! If you have content in multiple color spaces (for example, black text, CMYK and color-managed RGB vector content, and color-managed RGB imagery, Illustrator may not be the best best, one page or otherwise.

In terms of how to create PDF, from graphic arts software such as InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop, at Adobe we most strongly recommend use of PDF/X-4 (using export from InDesign and save as PDF from Illustrator and Photoshop) without converting colors to the destination color space, embedding profiles, and not flattening transparency.

- Dov
 

Stephen Marsh

Well-known member
Simon is in packaging, so Illustrator is the natural choice in that setting and probably at the forefront of his thoughts, however as Dov states, it is rather limiting in colour, typographic and other abilities when compared to InDesign.

Simon’s other point is spot on though, simply saving a Photoshop file as a PDF does not automatically bless it and make it better than say TIFF (unless it had text or “vector” layers that were preserved in the PDF). It is akin to a rejecting a job for a grand format print because the image was low resolution and asking for a vector version, and then the client resupplies the same file embedded into an EPS thinking that this will suddenly make the output scalable and vector!


Stephen Marsh
 
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Possumgal

Well-known member
It is akin to a rejecting a job for a grand format print because the image was low resolution and asking for a vector version, and then the client resupplies the same file embedded into an EPS thinking that this will suddenly make the output scalable and vector!


Stephen Marsh
Or worse, placing a JPEG into a Word document, then making a PDF. PDF does not cover a multitude of sins.
 
I got sent art for a barcode label as a png even though on their first job they had sent 5 different formats and the only printable one was a bitmap. I requested art as bitmap like last time, and they resaved the bad png and sent it back. Wish there was some way to make clients understand they have to go back to the original (whether that be the orginial photoshop creation or the barcode generation software)...
 

2mira

Well-known member
My question about
how can i get best printing quality from pdf format
and if ican compress pdf files - with out reduce printing quality
any way,
BIG THANKING for all above solutions
 

Dov Isaacs

Well-known member
My question about
how can i get best printing quality from pdf format
and if ican compress pdf files - with out reduce printing quality
any way,
BIG THANKING for all above solutions
There are several forms of compression within PDF.

The most obvious is image compression. Within PDF, ZIP compression and JPEG2000 lossless compression totally preserve image quality without any loss of detail or color information. Such compression should be used for any raster images which effectively portray what should have been expressed with text and vector artwork. For photographic imagery, JPEG Maximum Quality (= Minimum Compression) or JPEG2000 Maximum Quality (= Minimum Compression) generally suffices to achieve fairly significant file size compression without any noticeable quality loss. JPEG2000 supposedly had a edge over JPEG in terms of maintaining highest quality. Obviously, one should never subject digital imagery to multiple open-edit-save cycles with any lossy file format. If you use JPEG or JPEG2000 for imagery, it should be only for the final image, not while you work on same (TIFF or PSD would be much more appropriate as digital working image file formats). Note that within Adobe applications, PDF file generation options (.joboptions) offer JPEG (Automatic) and JPEG2000 (Automatic) settings for images. With those settings, each image is analyzed during PDF generation. If a particular image is determined to be non-photographic and potentially harmed by JPEG or JPEG2000 compression, it is compressed with either ZIP or JPEG2000 Lossless compression in lieu of JPEG or JPEG2000 lossy compression respectively. Adobe strongly recommends these “automatic” variants of compression options in conjunction with quality set to “maximum.”

The second form of compression that is available within PDF is object stream compression. This became available with PDF 1.5 (Acrobat 6). With object stream compression, all other aspects of the PDF file's object specifications including text and vector objects are internally flate (i.e. ZIP) compressed. This compression is totally lossless.

What do you need to get such compression?

Use of the PDF/X-4 PDF creation options in Adobe applications will automatically get you object stream compression. By default, the image compression settings are JPEG (Automatic), Maximum Quality for color/grayscale and CCITT Group 4 (lossless) for bitmaps. These are an excellent starting point and for the vast majority of situations yield the best compromise in terms of high image quality and reasonably high compression. You might (no guarantee) achieve slightly better results (slightly less lossiness and slightly better compression with color/grayscale image compression set to JPEG2000 (Automatic), Maximum Quality.

All modern RIPs should be able to accommodate PDF 1.5 as well as PDF/X-4.

- Dov
 

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