Is de-printer a viable tech?

MailGuru

Well-known member
I'm old. Which may/may not render me a little dense at times. At the risk of getting ridiculed by everyone else on the forum, I'm going to ask the question anyway: "WHY?" (I fail to see the point).

Basically, if I'm understanding this right, the technology allows paper to be reused up to 10 times by removing the ink from the printed page so you can print on it again later.

If I didn't want to keep the hard copy around, I wouldn't have printed it in the first place. I could have saved it as a word doc, pdf, spreadsheet, tif, jpg, etc. I only print things on paper when I want it to be permanent, or semi-permanent.

Is this common sense, or, is it just my boomer mentality.
 

YourCastle

Well-known member
"They aim to cut the amount of planet-heating carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the paper and pulp industry by reducing demand for office paper."

-- do they take into consideration the manufacturing and using of the new paper and hardware?

I'm ignorant, but it seems like people dumped their old cars for the exciting environment friendly electric cars, but wouldn't it have been better if they just kept driving their old cars?

PS: I too am old.
 

MailGuru

Well-known member
Edit: (hind-sight is 20/20)

I said ".......I wouldn't have printed it in the first place......."

What I should've said was "I wouldn't have used de printer to print de darn thing in de first place..." LOL
 

jwheeler

Well-known member
This reminds me of the Epson Paper Lab, which I think is a better idea. It recycles old paper by shredding it down and re-making it into new paper. This would be awesome where I work. Every office throughout the facility has a big shredder bin that we pay a company to pickup bi-weekly and shred in our parking lot. Instead, we could be shredding it in the Paper Lab and make it into new paper for the print shop I work in...especially right now with all of the paper shortages! The Paper Lab can even make colored sheets.
 
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scotts

Well-known member
I am to old. But my question on this, have they studied the chemical analysis of the vaporizing of the ink off the paper. It's not like the ink just disappears into nothingness. We all should know at this point in time, that it just changes shape and is broken down into smaller pieces. Is that better or worse than the CO2 for making paper. I don't have that answer, I've been in printing too long smelling the press room chemicals to know.
 

YourCastle

Well-known member
I am to old. But my question on this, have they studied the chemical analysis of the vaporizing of the ink off the paper. It's not like the ink just disappears into nothingness. We all should know at this point in time, that it just changes shape and is broken down into smaller pieces. Is that better or worse than the CO2 for making paper. I don't have that answer, I've been in printing too long smelling the press room chemicals to know.

those are all good points and questions, but don't worry, none of those particles go into the atmosphere as the user will breath them in.
 

YourCastle

Well-known member
Can you imagine getting paper through the printer the 2nd+ time after it has been heated so many times. No thanks.

and, of course, this paper would have to be for 1up projects with no bleed.

Just seems like a ... solution in search of a problem.
 

narseman

Well-known member
"They aim to cut the amount of planet-heating carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the paper and pulp industry by reducing demand for office paper."
If you believe the hype.. That CO2 (Less than one half of one percent of atmos gas.) has any more than a tiny fractional effect on global warming. Versus.. for example.. Water vapor.. (Clouds) (Yeah.. Huge effect) While CO2 (plant food) has had a tremendous effect on greening the the entire world and growing bigger and better crop yields. OK done. [Steps down from soap box.]
 

tngcas

Well-known member
You also have to consider the impact of the technology itself. If making the tech that vaporizes the ink out of the paper OR if making the de-paper uses MORE chemicals/machinery/carbon/rare minerals etc. etc. than the tech used to print the stuff on normal paper then it's not environmentally friendly. If we have to use 100 gallons of water to save using 10 gallons of water the "old fashioned way" then we didn't win.

Consider the waste involved in windmills. The amount of waste/toxins involved when you have to try to recycle one of those giant windmills doesn't necessarily outweigh the benefit of generating power another way.
 

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