looking for a creative print shop

gordo

Well-known member
I received a phone call today from someone looking for a printer in the greater Los Angeles area. They're doing a one color job reproducing drawings on uncoated stock and are looking to get a more vibrant effect on offset than samples they've seen. This is likely a project that will require some hand holding, experimenting and possibly FM screening. It could be a job for a toner-based digital press if that can provide more vibrant color than offset on uncoated stock. Can you recommend any print shops in the greater LA area that prints "outside the box"? Or do you know anyone who might know that this fellow can contact? Contact me off line if you don't want to publicize your answer.

thanks for any help you can provide.
 

issuepress

Member
What about Risograph? They have become very popular amongst artists and DIY publishers partly because of the vibrant (fluorescent) ink options and "outside the box" nature. I've been mapping the rise of risograph in art production for a number of years and there are quite a few in the greater LA area on the map: http://stencil.wiki/atlas/

Though, if they can't reach the level of vibrancy they desire with offset it may not be a good candidate. And, of course, there is a quality trade off relative to offset. But it definitely meets the need of niche publishing in a similar manner to the description of their requirements (vibrancy, fm screening, uncoated stock only).
 

DuaneBryant

Well-known member
Look for a reputable commercial printer with at least some experience in four-color black&white. Or two-blacks/duotone(AKA dual-dot black), or best...three-blacks/tritone. All that extra ink density can make some very dramatic images, if you find someone who knows how to spread out the tones in Ansell Adams fashion.
 

DuaneBryant

Well-known member
Using buzz words commonly thrown around today, you are making a High Dynamic Range: HDR. ... By overlapping and compounding the tonal range of two or three blacks
 

turbotom1052

Well-known member
Look for a reputable commercial printer with at least some experience in four-color black&white. Or two-blacks/duotone(AKA dual-dot black), or best...three-blacks/tritone. All that extra ink density can make some very dramatic images, if you find someone who knows how to spread out the tones in Ansell Adams fashion.

Id much prefer the duotone or tritone option for black and white reproduction, over 4 color black and white. Ive found 4 color black and white to be very good at laying down lots of ink, but very tough to keep neutral. Grey balance on such images require very close density tolerances, even when the pre press is spot on.
 

dabob

Well-known member
Id much prefer the duotone or tritone option for black and white reproduction, over 4 color black and white. Ive found 4 color black and white to be very good at laying down lots of ink, but very tough to keep neutral. Grey balance on such images require very close density tolerances, even when the pre press is spot on.

A long time ago in a land far away quad tones were run . . . but Turbo your right tritones are plenty dense enough back in the 90's we ran some of Ansel's work and they were just a little picky . . . would be a lot easier today . . it was still film and halftones back then . . . .
 

turbotom1052

Well-known member
A long time ago in a land far away quad tones were run . . . but Turbo your right tritones are plenty dense enough back in the 90's we ran some of Ansel's work and they were just a little picky . . . would be a lot easier today . . it was still film and halftones back then . . . .

I too worked for a company that continued to do film and halftones right up to the mid 90s. We specialized in coffee table photography books, and limited edition, numbered. and signed stuff. Most of it was 300 line duotone and tritone on super calendared archival paper.
 

What About Profitability?

Canon
What about Profitability?
Offset yields new advantages

Read All About It

   
Top