Poll: Switching to Affinity?

What is your level of experience and/or use of Affinity Designer, Photo, and Publisher?

  • We're seeing more clients using Affinity, but we don't have the software

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • We don't use Adobe or Affinity. We use Corel Draw or other software.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    18

jwheeler

Well-known member
I'm looking for some feedback on how popular the Affinity design software suite is. If you're not a graphic designer, please respond based on the designers at your print shop.
 

DYP

Well-known member
I answered don't like it, but that answer seems too harsh. For simple things it is ok but for completed layouts it just takes too much time because they have made thing harder than needs to be. The only place I really use it is when I want 16-bit output from designer.
 

DYP

Well-known member
Maybe a poll answer would be do you find it harder for easier to use than Adobe.
 

jwheeler

Well-known member
Maybe a poll answer would be do you find it harder for easier to use than Adobe.
I supposed, but for my purposes I feel like that's implied with the available answers. If they switch or are switching then they liked it and/or found it simple enough. Otherwise, there's the option you selected which is you didn't like Affinity. I trialed the software and made a few projects. I think the biggest challenge is learning any new software...figuring out where tools or specific menu functions are, what things are renamed as, and learning new shortcuts.
 

gordo

Well-known member
i bought and used both Affinity Publisher and Affinity Photo.
I have limited use for Publisher so it was a no-brainer purchase for me considering the price vs InDesign. I certainly preferred Publisher and would recommend it for any designer who's starting out or who does not like Adobe's subscription model.
I initially bought Photo as a way to support competition to Adobe's strangle hold on the market. Affinity Photo IMHO has prompted improvements to Photoshop (layer blend mode previews being just one example). It's a fantastic alternative to Adobe and at its price point and with no monthly subscription it's a real bargain. If you know Photoshop you should have no problem using Affinity Photo. Highly recommended.
 

Gianni_S

Well-known member
Hi, switched during lockdown in Italy. What can I say?
The learning curve is not steep as you may believe. There are things that are different but can be achievable with a workaround (some other not… I must admit it).
Now I have 2 mac seat; one with perpetual licenses from Affinity and other competitors and is running damn well for creative jobs, and I really love it
The other one is only for Adobe CC, but I have to tell the truth, I won't no longer support them, probably this is the last year of subscription due to costs and I don't see so much useful improvement in that suite.
I also did the same thing for prepress tasks putting on the ring PitStop Pro and PDFToolbox. I can hardly tell which on works better, considering that Callas has a perpetual license and has solved things that PutStop failed miserably.
These are my 2 cents about this topic.
I see a future for Affinity? Absolutely yes.
 

gordo

Well-known member
While I have no interest in switching from Adobe to Affinity, I will install Affinity apps if we start receiving Affinity files from our customers and try to incorporate them into our workflow.

pd

If you are receiving PDFs from your customers what difference does the particular authoring app - Adobe or Affinity make?
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
Gordo, my comment was based on my customers providing native files in lieu of PDF files.
Ah. Yes. Native vs PDF.
Adobe wants you confused!
You need to buy another product!
The solution Affinity has in hand - they are PDF native.
Yes, they store in the affinity format for fully featured editing.
But we have casual users on Affinity Designer to view and edit their PDFs and they think it's the bomb.
So no, we can't let go of Adobe, yet.
Mostly because of a few significant workflow issues.
But I use Affinity suite at home and it totally fits my needs.
And don't get me started on where Adobe is taking their product . . . .
 

prepressdork

Well-known member
Ah. Yes. Native vs PDF.
Adobe wants you confused!
You need to buy another product!
The solution Affinity has in hand - they are PDF native.
Yes, they store in the affinity format for fully featured editing.
But we have casual users on Affinity Designer to view and edit their PDFs and they think it's the bomb.
So no, we can't let go of Adobe, yet.
Mostly because of a few significant workflow issues.
But I use Affinity suite at home and it totally fits my needs.
And don't get me started on where Adobe is taking their product . . . .
I don't know a lot about Affinity. Is Affinity Publisher also a PDF native format?
 

jrsc

Well-known member
I wanted to switch our whole company and gave it a try but just couldn't get past a few things. I would consider looking at it again after the next release.

One of the main issues had to do with color and color management. A big one for me was it did not support spot color in EPS files. We have so many logos in eps format with corporate pantone colors defined and both placing in publisher or opening in designer would lose the pantone colors. I also found the PDF exports difficult to properly deal with color management.

In addition, it is different enough that if you have years of experience with Adobe it's going to be a frustrating few months to transition. For someone starting out I think it would be just as easy to learn as Adobe. We also found that some features we use regularly weren't available, such as the ability to select same fill or stroke color.

One of the best things about Affinity was how fast it was. Adobe products are so bloated now and Affinity felt so much faster. I feel like they can get there someday and I'm really hoping they do.
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
I wanted to switch our whole company and gave it a try but just couldn't get past a few things. I would consider looking at it again after the next release.

One of the main issues had to do with color and color management. A big one for me was it did not support spot color in EPS files. We have so many logos in eps format with corporate pantone colors defined and both placing in publisher or opening in designer would lose the pantone colors. I also found the PDF exports difficult to properly deal with color management.

In addition, it is different enough that if you have years of experience with Adobe it's going to be a frustrating few months to transition. For someone starting out I think it would be just as easy to learn as Adobe. We also found that some features we use regularly weren't available, such as the ability to select same fill or stroke color.

One of the best things about Affinity was how fast it was. Adobe products are so bloated now and Affinity felt so much faster. I feel like they can get there someday and I'm really hoping they do.

Search in Affinity Designer:

Screen Shot 2022-05-14 at 5.06.01 PM.jpg
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
For those who say Affinity isn't the $ame as Adobe, yes, it is not the $ame.
Affinity does have a TREMENDOUS amount of web tutorials available.
And no, according to their website it doesn't yet import eps with spot colors retained.
So there will be use cases for Adobe products. Not going to deny that.
The Adobe tax can go away for all other use cases. YMMV.
 

What About Profitability?

Canon
What about Profitability?
Offset yields new advantages

Read All About It

   
Top