Xerox Versant 180, #10 envelopes bleed 2 sides??

So I have an envelope job I would like to bleed on 2 sides, anyone have a solution for this. I send the file with bleeds and attempt to get it to bleed on the left and bottom edge but it still leaves a white line at the edge. I think you can achieve this on the digital envelope presses, is there some way of doing this on a 180?
 
That is what I was thinking. Just thought maybe I was missing something. Can you bleed envelopes on a digital envelope press like a Xante or Oce?
 

pippip

Well-known member
It's not advised but you can achieve this, at least on one side. I wouldn't be running many.

Here is Just A Printer explaining how he does it on KM digital presses.
 

gregbatch

Well-known member
You want to be as precise as possible setting the extra width. Just enough to get rid of the no-print area and tolerate a little bounce. You don't want to leave a bunch of extra toner on the belt. Depending on where you need it to bleed, you may need to do it the old way by opening the flaps and running long edge feed. The machines are very tolerant of width. You can get away with a little difference in length (direction of travel), but not too much before before it thinks there is a feed or jam issue. Fortunately, you don't get much, if any bounce in the direction of travel, so a little is all you need.
 
That is what I am looking for. I never thought of doing it that way and opening the flaps. I have done some A size envelopes that way in the past. Any more I just stack them in tray 6 and let em rip. It is only for 1000 so I can probably get away with that . Thanks
 

YourCastle

Well-known member
any chance you can print a flat sheet and have a local partner convert them? The additional advantage would be that it's only print on one side
 

gregbatch

Well-known member
I am sure the last I checked that it was 5000 minimum for converting. Thats my last resort.. thx
4Over will offset print 4/0 and convert as little as 250 for $82, 1,000 for $120. You MUST use their template if it bleeds.
NOTE: 60# Offset #10. 70# offset and 70# linen also available. Window adds about $20. Other sizes only available in 70# - A7, #9, & 9x12
 
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gregbatch

Well-known member
Don't forget that ijet and most other inkjet envelope printers can bleed. You might find a trade partner that could do small runs economically when needed.
 

TJPrinter

Well-known member
You want to be as precise as possible setting the extra width. Just enough to get rid of the no-print area and tolerate a little bounce. You don't want to leave a bunch of extra toner on the belt. Depending on where you need it to bleed, you may need to do it the old way by opening the flaps and running long edge feed. The machines are very tolerant of width. You can get away with a little difference in length (direction of travel), but not too much before before it thinks there is a feed or jam issue. Fortunately, you don't get much, if any bounce in the direction of travel, so a little is all you need.
If you can find a #10 with a longer flap this is the way to go. The more toner you leave behind the more problems you'll have. This reminds me of how I could cheat a bit on a offset press with envelope bleeds, it works great for a while but eventually the ink catches up and starts going where it shouldn't. And so will the toner that's left behind.
 

gregbatch

Well-known member
Maybe do a larger sheet as a slip sheet every 20, 50, 1000 envelopes to "clean"?
It will be fine. Unlike an offset press which just keeps building up ink on the blanket, a digital press has a mechanism for removing toner from the belt. Most machines these days run patches between pages to monitor color and image quality. Those patches of toner are then removed by the machine. A little extra toner is not going to make a difference. Excessive amounts may cause issues over time.
 

gregbatch

Well-known member
How do the inkjets clean the "excess" or will it build up like a press?
With a straight line printhead you are printing over a small gap. Below the gap is a waste ink tray with an absorbing pad. When you do a head cleaning it purges ink onto the pad. The pad will also handle anything that doesn't land on the paper. Again, you don't want much excess or you will be going through pads quickly.
 

TJPrinter

Well-known member
Excessive amounts may cause issues over time.
Hopefully people see this part and your other post about not wanting to leave too much extra toner on the belt. Someone may get the idea that now they can bleed the side of a 12x18 and eliminate the cutting. Small areas on a #10 like the poster is looking for should be okay now and then. Some good info you provided, I think your spot on.
 

gregbatch

Well-known member
Hopefully people see this part and your other post about not wanting to leave too much extra toner on the belt. Someone may get the idea that now they can bleed the side of a 12x18 and eliminate the cutting. Small areas on a #10 like the poster is looking for should be okay now and then. Some good info you provided, I think your spot on.
Good point. Although you could change the width to bring a solid or screen within a hair from the edge and then shave it when needing to get something out quickly and you can't wait for paper.
 

richsweeney

Well-known member
The way I did this is similar to just a printer guy, It helps if your your file has bleeds, then keep adding .1 to your size. Of course feed in non bleed side first. I am using a versant 180
 

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