Basic creaser?

bcr

Well-known member
Hi guys,

Getting our new production printers very soon and I was thinking it would be good to get a creaser for occasional printing of greetings cards and for creasing book covers.

Local supplier has this machine which is inexpensive and it will crease up to 400gsm.


Volumes will be very low and infrequent. Will this machine be sufficient? Is there anything I should know about creasers?

Thanks!
 
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pippip

Well-known member
What sort of things are you going to be printing on these production machines?

The only reason I ask is that back in the day when we upgraded to a proper production digital press someone suggested to us did we want a creaser. At the time we were like no we have a manual one for small jobs etc. In the end they gave us a good deal on a second hand morgana autocreaser as we were buying a brand new folder off them. It's amazing the amount we actually use the creaser for. Flyers, brochures, greeting cards, book covers. Anything that has toner on the folds basically. I can't believe at the time we didn't really think we needed it. I'd really recommend looking at a second hand production creaser if you can.
 

keith1

Well-known member
If it's that infrequent and such low volume you could make up a little jig for jobs as they occur to square & hold the card in place then use a ruler as a straight edge and the back of a knife, or some such similar to make the score.
Alternatively, set the back fence of your cutter (guillotine) to the desired depth, load a handful of cards, and bring down the clamp as a straight edge.
Neither results in a pretty score/crease but does the job. If you want pretty, or have a larger quantity, farm the job out.
 
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bcr

Well-known member
What sort of things are you going to be printing on these production machines?

The only reason I ask is that back in the day when we upgraded to a proper production digital press someone suggested to us did we want a creaser. At the time we were like no we have a manual one for small jobs etc. In the end they gave us a good deal on a second hand morgana autocreaser as we were buying a brand new folder off them. It's amazing the amount we actually use the creaser for. Flyers, brochures, greeting cards, book covers. Anything that has toner on the folds basically. I can't believe at the time we didn't really think we needed it. I'd really recommend looking at a second hand production creaser if you can.
Thanks for this.

95% of use will be printing office docs and evidence with tab sheets which will be either bound using the modular in line punch or an offline tape binder.

About 5% will be very small runs of greetings cards and book covers. Basically just dipping our toes in the water. We also don't have the space for more large machinery. There is scope to insource a lot more book/booklet production over time but we're not basing our plans around doing that, so we would see how we get on and acquire better equipment as needed over time
 

bcr

Well-known member
If it's that infrequent and such low volume you could make up a little jig for jobs as they occur to square & hold the card in place then use a ruler as a straight edge and the back of a knife, or some such similar to make the score.
Alternatively, set the back fence of your cutter (guillotine) to the desired depth, load a handful of cards, and bring down the clamp as a straight edge.
Neither results in a pretty score/crease but does the job. If you want pretty, or have a larger quantity, farm the job out.
Thanks for this - I'm not that handy tbh. Are cheap manual creasers not worth having then?
 

pippip

Well-known member
Ah no, manual creasers are very good. Professional finish, just time consuming. We have a manual one to which we use for small sized jobs that need to be trimmed first, like memorial cards. Sometimes use it on larger jobs if they give trouble through the morgana.
 
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Ynot_UK

Well-known member
Have a look at the small semi automatic creasestream desktop machines, they are reasonably priced and reasonably fast for small quantity runs.
 
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chucknovo

Member
I would bite the bullet and find a good used Morgana Auto Creaser. Set you back some $ but you won't regret it once you see how well it does. And if your volume grows with the new printers it's capable of several 1000 pieces per hour - with every one perfect.
 

Ynot_UK

Well-known member
I would bite the bullet and find a good used Morgana Auto Creaser. Set you back some $ but you won't regret it once you see how well it does. And if your volume grows with the new printers it's capable of several 1000 pieces per hour - with every one perfect.
We were in a similar position and found an Autocreaser Pro 33 in great condition from a local litho printer closing down his business at the start of Covid.
 
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bcr

Well-known member
I would bite the bullet and find a good used Morgana Auto Creaser. Set you back some $ but you won't regret it once you see how well it does. And if your volume grows with the new printers it's capable of several 1000 pieces per hour - with every one perfect.
thanks for this. we don't have the space for a standalone machine and our volumes will be very low. it's possible that they increase in the future, but we will be moving offices then and can address that then.
 

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