Custom PDF Settings...

mattbeals

Well-known member
Re: Custom PDF Settings...

Brad said: All PDF /X standards use PDF 1.3 except PDF/X-4:2007 which uses 1.4 and keeps transparency.

Not true. PDF/X-1:2001 and PDF/X-3:2001 use PDF v1.3. But PDF/X-1a:2003 and PDF/X-3:2003 use PDF v1.4. And now PDF/X-4 and X-5 should both be on PDF v1.4.
 

mattbeals

Well-known member
Re: Custom PDF Settings...

You'll have to go through and look at what the PDF/X settings are and reconcile those with your observations. ;)

And people think *I'm* crazy...
 

RiotMac

Active member
Re: Custom PDF Settings...

Youre right PDF/X-3:2003 supports 1.4... sorry brosif.

and I'm not crazy. Now PDF/A supports 1.4... mr. pdf
 

disbellj

Well-known member
Re: Custom PDF Settings...

Matt,

"You'll have to go through and look at what the PDF/X settings are and reconcile those with your observations."

I did. But the PDF/X settings aren't the problem I mentioned in my last email. But the PDF settings do show the problem.

The problem is that the 'Preserve Numbers (Ignore Linked Profiles)' does not do what it says. And by making a PDF with High Quality vs. PDF/X-1a, I can see that. Why? Because High Quality joboptions' 'Leave Color Unchanged' does just that, so one-color black type stays one-color black. But PDF/X-1a joboptions' 'Convert All to CMYK' CREATES four-color blacks when they were one-color blacks before. How? Because Adobe's 'Preserve Numbers (Ignore Linked Profiles)' is not doing as it says it does. If it did, then four-color blacks wouldn't be created from one-color blacks. Any differing CMYK profiles would be ignored (like the settings says) and not color managed (which they are getting converted or they wouldn't change CMYK numbers). No need for me to reconcile this any further. I knew beforehand about this problem (and have said so on the forums multiple times at least, and why I use CMYK color management policy Off, which keeps this problem from happening of four-color blacks getting created from one-color blacks). This is just another way to show the problem.

Screw the PDF settings. They just show the problem. The problem (as I said before and you obviously didn't get, or wouldn't have mentioned me having to look over the PDF settings again) is the CMYK color management policy not doing what it's name implies.

"And people think I'm crazy..."

OK. Never said you were or I wasn't. But OK.

Don
 

mattbeals

Well-known member
Re: Custom PDF Settings...

Nope, pdf/x-1a:2003 was basically just an update to pdf/x-1a:2001 to support pdf v1.4. But that's basically all it did.

Matt Beals
(206) 618-2537

Sent from Matt's Treo 680
 

mattbeals

Well-known member
Re: Custom PDF Settings...

No Don, I got it and you never said that I was crazy. I wanted someone else to verify. And I wasn't particularly meaning you. I was trying to lead people down a path of discovery so that they could evaluate it for themselves.

Matt Beals
(206) 618-2537

Sent from Matt's Treo 680
 
Re: Custom PDF Settings...

Brad wrote:

"PDF 1.3 flattens transparency. PDF 1.4 and greater keeps tranparency. All PDF /X standards use PDF 1.3 except PDF/X-4:2007 which uses 1.4 and keeps transparency. "

Just to be clear, the export presets built into Adobe CS3 for PDF/X-4 uses PDF version 1.4, but the specification for PDF/X-4 allows up to PDF version 1.6 (Acrobat 7). If you want to create PDF/X-4 files that are PDF version 1.6 from Adobe CS3, then you need to create your own presets and use the built-in preflight in Acrobat, Pitstop, or some other tool to verify/make the PDF conform to PDF/X-4. That is the method we currently use.

Abe Hayhurst
Director of Color and Technology
We Do Graphics, Inc.
 

deanb

Member
Re: Custom PDF Settings...

The trouble with sending PDF settings to customers is getting them to use them. Personally I prefer the open file and the PDF with every job.
 

deanb

Member
Re: Custom PDF Settings...

There is one thing that PDF will never compensate for and that is for people who don't know what they are doing. If you're fixing a PDF then you're only fixing the symptoms, not the cause. Get the open files along with your PDF's and you'll make fixing a lot of PDF's, much easier.

Edited by: Dean Bonkovich on Oct 2, 2007 2:30 AM
 

disbellj

Well-known member
Re: Custom PDF Settings...

Dean,

There would be those that would disagree and say that fixing the native files is also fixing the symptoms (of a bad designer) and not fixing the cause (training the designer). But who has the time to train a new designer to do the right things? And how many printers turn away a job because it was made by someone that didn't know what they were doing? Printers accept the PDFs or native files, say that that's all we have to use, and prepress has to fix it and make it work. So we do.

Of course, I'm just making excuses and should give a SMACK DOWN to any and all who would do such things :)

"whoopin that candy ass"

Don
 

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