NEW Adobe Terms of Use eBlast

chriscozi

Well-known member
Hello all,

Firstly - IANAL (I am not a lawyer).
The new terms from Adobe spell out some items of interest for Printers. Here is a shorthand of what the eBlast says:

1. Files found to be illegal or infringing that are uploaded to Adobe user areas will be removed and they are not liable for any losses this creates.
This includes fonts and graphics to which the user claims to have copyright or license.
2. Arbitration of disputes is mandatory.
3. Only AFTER a judge has deemed a single lawsuit is a class action and the 'terms' are invalid can someone claim class action status.

Under the complete terms document we see some additional areas of interest.
(And I just noticed after copying the link that they added a tracking ID to the link - (ht____w.adobe.com/legal/terms-2.html?trackingid=5WYL7YH8&mv=email)

1. They have the right to view or listen to any content you upload - for several reasons and through several methods.
2. "You agree that your decision to use, access, or license the Services and Software is not contingent on the delivery of any future functionality or features, or dependent on any oral or written public comments made by us regarding future functionality or features."
3. "We recommend that you back up your Content and Creative Cloud Customer Fonts elsewhere regularly"
4. Those same "Creative Cloud Customer Fonts" can be removed if some other entity claims you don't have a valid license.
5. "4.2 Licenses to Your Content. Solely for the purposes of operating or improving the Services and Software, you grant us a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free sublicensable, license, to use, reproduce, publicly display, distribute, modify, create derivative works based on, publicly perform, and translate the Content."

Thoughts or comments?
:)
 

PricelineNegotiator

Well-known member
As someone who uses cloud storage more than probably most of the people on here, I really don't see any cause for alarm with this. It's their hardware, they are responsible for what is on there. They need to be proactive for obvious reasons. And yes, they are going to use your data. If you don't like this, host your own personal server. It's not impossible and I think in 10 years it'll be common.
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
A question by way of analogy- if you store stuff in a bank’s safety deposit box, are they responsible for what’s in it? Is it their right to use your safety deposit stuff as they wish?
Gordo and all,
I agree with the sentiment but see it all around me.
That said the issue(s) that REALLY bother me are the knowledge that we are being herded towards two new program paradigms within the Adobe software space.
Those two items are:
1. Color library control - we are waiting for the 'Pantone' replacement app.
2. Font library control - we are seeing the creep to an online moderated library.
BOTH of these 'future' program environments can and probably will be tied to the license we hold.
Think how your desktop app usability will be impacted if you can't get your fonts and you can't specify a color from a library?
I predict this will end badly for Adobe (Microsoft doc format) because as softly as you tread 'life will find a way.' :-0
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
- Never thought I would quote Jeff Goldblum from Jurrassic Park.
:sneaky:
Twice - "I predict this will end badly'.

And does anyone else remember the ?rumor? that Adobe was going to introduce a PC with their own OS that you could purchase to use their products?
 

jrhmobile

Active member
A question by way of analogy- if you store stuff in a bank’s safety deposit box, are they responsible for what’s in it? Is it their right to use your safety deposit stuff as they wish?
To further consider your analogy: If you store your stuff in a bank's safety deposit box, are they responsible to the FCC, various worldwide communications regulators and government busybodies for the contents in that box? The answer tothat question would be no. But remote servers and services are.

As for rights to use whatever you store there? I would argue that's a non-starter in either case. And if anyone challenges this with Adobe in any of many legal venues, perhaps something hard to defend on Adobe's part.
 

PricelineNegotiator

Well-known member
A question by way of analogy- if you store stuff in a bank’s safety deposit box, are they responsible for what’s in it? Is it their right to use your safety deposit stuff as they wish?
Are you going to put illegal drugs in your safety deposit box? Because hosting illegal things (pirated movies etc) on the cloud would be problematic for Adobe.
 

pcmodem

Registered Users
This tells me that Adobe is not encrypting your data when stored on their servers. For those security conscious, you shouldn't store your data with Adobe.
If they did encrypt your data, only you or people in your company would be able to view the data. At this point, Adobe wouldn't be able to view the data. Which would then make it impossible for a company to ask Adobe to remove data from your account due to a violation.
 

thomaus

Active member
On a tangent, our Adobe Customer Success Manager keeps emailing us to try to get us to start a 'free' year of stock photos on the anniversary of our CC subscription. The recent email even said "I am sure you must have reviewed my last email." I guess there was tracking on the previous emails. We don't use many stock photos but do keep an account at istockphoto where we're happy to pay for what we use. So adding that 'complimentary' bonus just seems like a bother.

We don't use any of the cloud services Adobe offers. As far as I can tell the main reason any of those products exist is to potentially increase the monthly subscriptions revenue for Adobe. We have a small work-group and it seems more of a bother to start storing things in additional place...that requires logging in to access. We have servers and backups locally for files, graphics, fonts, etc. And as it stated above, their fine print says we'd still need to do that anyway.

The only guaranteed 'success' if we signed onto all their clouds services would be a slight tick up in our Adobe Customer Success Manager's sales quota.
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
Has anyone else ever heard of a 'Customer Success Manager?'
And why does Adobe need to call them that, anyway?
What is it that they would consider success? - meeting memos would be awesomely bigly things ;-)
Don't think it's the same as the customer assumes.
(All snark intended)
 

MailGuru

Well-known member
Just for edification - A "Customer Success Manager" is a person whose job it is to successfully retain you as a customer, while simultaneously screwing you over.
 

zevrix

Well-known member
Has anyone else ever heard of a 'Customer Success Manager?'
And why does Adobe need to call them that, anyway?

Is it just me or it's totally bizarre to call it "Success MANAGER"? "Managing" implies that they may at some point also tone your success levels down if, heaven forbid, you achieve too much of it.

I could understand "Success Enabler" or "Success Creator" or "Success Accelerator" or whatever other buzzword that would imply that success is a goal in itself that should only be achieved and expanded further.

But maybe it's just me...
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
Is it just me or it's totally bizarre to call it "Success MANAGER"? "Managing" implies that they may at some point also tone your success levels down if, heaven forbid, you achieve too much of it.

I could understand "Success Enabler" or "Success Creator" or "Success Accelerator" or whatever other buzzword that would imply that success is a goal in itself that should only be achieved and expanded further.

But maybe it's just me...
meeting memos would be awesomely bigly things ;-)
 

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