Trying to print 220" long spread sheet. Not having much luck

BobBeerbower

New member
I'm trying to print my macro plan, basically a very long Excel spreadsheet, on an Epson T7270 printer. The print measures 36" x 220". The header row prints out across the entire length but the cells below only print for the first 80" or so. I spoke with Epson and they said that the driver becomes eratic after 90" and that I would need to use RIP software. Before purchasing any more software I'd like to know if what they told me makes sense and if there are other options. We had a 9700 before the T7270 and we were able to print on that printer but it was admittedly hit or miss and I'd waste quite a bit of paper before getting one to print the full length. I do have Photoshop and tried to convert the spreadsheet into a jpg and print through Photoshop but I'm not having much success with that either
 

BobBeerbower

New member
You need a RIP.
Thanks,

Would you know if RIP is built into any of the Adobe products. I'm in a corporate environment and getting permission to install software that's already on their approved list is much easier than looking at un approved solutions.
 

kdw75

Well-known member
We have regularly run longer than 90" files out of Photoshop to our 9900 without issue. For years I had found forums talking about this limit, but we ran banners that were 12 feet plus many times without a RIP and they worked fine.

You might try making a PDF of the file and then importing it into Photoshop to print. Epson seems to prefer printing out of Photoshop. You probably only need to rasterize it at 300dpi or maybe 240 or even 180.
 
Last edited:

gregbatch

Well-known member
You can use Acrobat as a simple RIP. Create a PDF of it and then "print as image" in advanced settings to rasterize the output. You can set the resolution there.
 

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