Where's Your Ambition?

gordo

Well-known member
569 Where's Your Ambition?.jpg
 

Ulrich

Well-known member
If that guy really has been a longer while at the top of his company, then it's actually hard to imagine that the shop hasn't gone bankrupt yet...
 

tngcas

Well-known member
Why isn’t it okay to be content doing a job you’re good at? Why does everybody have to always be trying to move up? What if you like where you’re at.

It’s not a failure to be content with your job. This obsession with trying to force people into job positions they may not want or be good at all in the name of “moving up” is annoying at best and toxic at worse.
 

gordo

Well-known member
Why isn’t it okay to be content doing a job you’re good at? Why does everybody have to always be trying to move up? What if you like where you’re at.

It’s not a failure to be content with your job. This obsession with trying to force people into job positions they may not want or be good at all in the name of “moving up” is annoying at best and toxic at worse.

I've known many Ludlow typesetters, film strippers and scanner operators who would agree with you.
 
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keith1

Well-known member
It’s not a failure to be content with your job. This obsession with trying to force people into job positions they may not want or be good at all in the name of “moving up” is annoying at best and toxic at worse.
Unfortunately it's often the only way to get paid more money. It's a huge failing of many industries (in my opinion). If a person isn't 'promoted' or is but doesn't accept a promotion the mindset is that that person is somehow a failure. As a result people are often 'promoted' to a job they never aspired to and worse, are incapable of performing near as well as the job they leave behind. I believe it's called 'The Peter Principle' - promoted beyond one's capabilities. We've all seen them. Grumpy incompetent managers who should never have been put into a situation of supervision. Meantime, they may well have been the best damn press operator (or whatever) the company had ever seen.
Large companies especially are rife with people that should probably have been left in the mail room. And look no farther than politics. How many of those in charge of health or education, agriculture etc. are really qualified for those positions? The system is broken.

Back closer to topic. I worked (once upon a time) at a large family owned company operated by brothers. They had inherited it from their father but had grown up within the business. They were great.
However their kids wanted no part of it. I suppose they could have been set with a job for life, but nope. Not for them. When the time came the company was sold. You would know the place Gord. On Homer St.
 

davarino

Well-known member
The most reasonable response to being a beneficiary (e.g., of nepotism) is gratitude for the opportunity.

We prefer, though, to think that our good fortune is due to our own efforts or superior characteristics.
 

De-Inking

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