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Remember the good old days of film?

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  • #16
    We also had wide, deep tank film processors in their days.
    To handle those heavy roller racks we had an electric lifting mechanism, a drip tray to put underneath the rack after it was up in the air and a transport bridge on wheels to carry it over to the specially built sink.
    All that gear was getting more and more use when the processors were getting older...
    Yes, it was a nuisance, but an experienced operator could usually get the processor back into operation within 15-20 minutes, without splashing chemicals around.

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    • #17
      Hmm! The deeeeeeep processors, always a joy to clean, the largest one I worked on could take a 2500cm wide and 5000 cm long film done on a huge Misomex punch-card step and repeat. And yes you got films stuck on the bottom roller of the fixer bath or it threw a cog or something else that required you to take out the rack.
      Still waiting on the bits I ordered, so until then I seem to remember that you can get rollers looking like new with a mixture of bleach and hydrogen peroxide.

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      • #18
        Our wide film processors (130 and 160 cm) were technically brilliant, with many features including a unique roller-rack design.
        Unbelievable as it may seem, they had (staggered) stainless steel rollers all around, except at the entry table and for squeegeeing at each rack exit.
        No sagging in the middle of long rollers, so easy to keep clean.
        They were Italian ATAMS processors.
        I considered them the Rolls Royce of film processors.
        A Danish machines engineer I showed them to was astounded, said he never saw such design before and that such designs were too expensive to produce.
        I believe ATAMS had hundreds of their machines working around Milano alone in the Ninteen '70 and '80.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Repro_Pro View Post
          Our wide film processors (130 and 160 cm) were technically brilliant, with many features including a unique roller-rack design.
          Unbelievable as it may seem, they had (staggered) stainless steel rollers all around, except at the entry table and for squeegeeing at each rack exit.
          No sagging in the middle of long rollers, so easy to keep clean.
          They were Italian ATAMS processors.
          I considered them the Rolls Royce of film processors.
          A Danish machines engineer I showed them to was astounded, said he never saw such design before and that such designs were too expensive to produce.
          I believe ATAMS had hundreds of their machines working around Milano alone in the Ninteen '70 and '80.
          It seem ATAMS vanished without a trace, at least on the internet.

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          • #20
            Their name changed to OVIT.
            I guess they abandoned film processing altogether...

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            • #21
              if you really wanna take a stroll down memory lane and glorify the good ole days why dont you dump film processor and go with tray developing.

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              • #22
                Coating wet emulsion onto glass plates first, that will nicely round up the gratification...
                However, the practical reality is that photographic processing of imaged films is still in demand but became harder to find.
                Hence, revitalizing old equipment became necessary.

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                • #23
                  Repro - Pro.


                  Well done - for remembering "Glass Plates"



                  The benefit of "Hindsight is wonderful" I wished I'd remembered "Secruity Inks"


                  Alois

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                  • #24
                    Participating in forum discussions certainly helps stirring memories.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by turbotom1052 View Post
                      if you really wanna take a stroll down memory lane and glorify the good ole days why dont you dump film processor and go with tray developing.
                      I suppose it will date me most horribly if I were to mention "Staromat" and "Diatronic" as well as "Stripfilm" and "Blutlaugensalz" red and yellow (Kaliumhexacyanidoferrat, don´t know what you call it in the english speaking bits of the world) By the way just heard today that the parts I ordered will be ready "another" next week.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Slammer View Post

                        I suppose it will date me most horribly if I were to mention "Staromat" and "Diatronic" as well as "Stripfilm" and "Blutlaugensalz" red and yellow ([B]Kaliumhexacyanidoferrat, don´t know what you call it in the english speaking bits of the world)
                        Rubylith and Amberlith, respectively.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by alibryan View Post

                          Rubylith and Amberlith, respectively.
                          Rubylith, yes, that was the brand name on the bottle if I remember, but we called it Blutlaugensaltz or blood alkaline salt.

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                          • #28
                            From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
                            Rubylithis a brand of masking film, invented and trademarked by the Ulano Corporation. Today the brand has become genericized to the point that it has become synonymous with all coloured masking films.

                            Rubylith consists of two films sandwiched together. The bottom layer is a clear polyester backing sheet; the top layer is a translucent, red-(ruby-)coloured, sheet. The top layer can be cut with a knife and peeled away from the bottom layer. The top layer's colour is light-safe for orthochromatic films (which are sensitive to blue and green light but insensitive to red light).

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Repro_Pro View Post
                              From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
                              Rubylithis a brand of masking film, invented and trademarked by the Ulano Corporation. Today the brand has become genericized to the point that it has become synonymous with all coloured masking films.

                              Rubylith consists of two films sandwiched together. The bottom layer is a clear polyester backing sheet; the top layer is a translucent, red-(ruby-)coloured, sheet. The top layer can be cut with a knife and peeled away from the bottom layer. The top layer's colour is light-safe for orthochromatic films (which are sensitive to blue and green light but insensitive to red light).
                              True, my memory is playing tricks with me it would seem, but then again, it was a loong time ago.

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                              • #30
                                So, I´ll bet you have all been waiting with bated breath for the next gripping instalment of Slammer and the processor.

                                Well I got the new parts and it only took another five they-will-be-ready-next-week´s. But I got them and they fit, they fit actually quite well and that is the main thing.

                                One other problem reared it´s ugly head; one of the gear wheels was missing from the fixer rack, the one that drives the entire lower roller bunch. So I have had one printed. Just picked it up today and it looks really nice, it was copied from one of the originals and rendered with a carbon reenforced nylon filament. It fits and it works.

                                I must admit though that I screwed the documentation up regarding the fuse box and wring, but I now have a wiring diagram for that processor and it should be a simple thing, I am however getting my colleague onto the act, he is an electrician and it should be even simpler. We will see.

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