"Darker" or "brighter" print (ink density?)

LOL - I was just pointing out that in InDesign those are the two "default" black options. Maybe the offset printers should make a coalition and talk to Adobe about not making those the two "black options"
Heavens forbid.
Don't give them something else to 'help' with.

That is if we want to have some consistency and reliability.
One Recent Example: Changing RGB White to an existing 'transparent' color for web designers. Oops. "Where is my white type?" It disappeared when you converted to CMYK for printers!

And do not talk about anything recent related to fonts.
BUT - you say the operating systems control the fonts! Sure they do. Wink Wink Nudge Nudge.
Most of our recent 'font issues' started AFTER some unnamed software company decided to monetize their font library on line.
And just suspiciously a real competitor in the 'creative space' NEEDS to have reliable pdf font compatibility.
Amazing how those pesky font issues just keep changing, isn't it?

Sigh.
Not paranoid, not not not.
:)
 
LOL - I was just pointing out that in InDesign those are the two "default" black options. Maybe the offset printers should make a coalition and talk to Adobe about not making those the two "black options"
No there are not 2 default black options, there is black and there is registration, which is clearly labelled as registration. If users select this swatch for printed elements, it's not Adobe's fault, it's users creating content for print who don't understand the print process.
 
I'm sorry, but I can't, cause they didn't even allow me to take the test-print home. It was just a single sheet.

Is this normal - I don't know...
 
The buyer should always have a "contract color" proof.
If giving a press OK approval at press side, the customer is always allowed to take a same as OK signed sheet with them.
 
No there are not 2 default black options, there is black and there is registration, which is clearly labelled as registration. If users select this swatch for printed elements, it's not Adobe's fault, it's users creating content for print who don't understand the print process.
InDesign gives these options in the "default" color swatches window. There's clearly two options for black, one produces a nice rich black and the other produces a flat black.
Expecting anyone beyond "sophisticated" users to know they need to custom mix a black color for offset printing use is unrealistic.

The buyer should always have a "contract color" proof.
If giving a press OK approval at press side, the customer is always allowed to take a same as OK signed sheet with them.
Our printshop does not do proofs at all unless specifically requested by the customer. Our customer base wants fast printing, we limit everything that slows down the process, printed proofs slow down that process. Even when we do provide a customer a printed proof we tell them upfront that we can't guarantee the final print will color match that proof exactly because something as simple as changing a drum can shift the colors slightly. It really depends on the expectation you setup with the printer ahead of time. You need spell out your exact requirements and tolerances for color matching ahead of time and make sure you're aware of how the print shop you're working with is setup to operate since there is such a wide range of "types" of printers and printing.

You get what you pay for. Time is money. The tighter your tolerances the more money you should be prepared to spend.
 

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