Onyx RIP Quality Setting

kdw75

Well-known member
When you choose the print quality it is something like “720@720x720” or 360@720x1440. Can anyone tell me what the number before the @ represents? I have looked and can’t find any info.
 

Ulrich

Well-known member
i do not know

but after a look to simular dialogues (all with the same "select printing mode"-option in the same window in different software) i guess following:

It is just "named", in the meaning that the number in front of the at-sign is the real chosen resolution for that mode, the two numbers behind the at-sign are the adressabiltiy. (look with the search of Gordo´s Print Blog: https://the-print-guide.blogspot.com/search?q=inkjet+resolution)

Just for curiosity: Are there any options to create own printing modes or renaming them?

Best

Ulrich
 

kdw75

Well-known member
i do not know

but after a look to simular dialogues (all with the same "select printing mode"-option in the same window in different software) i guess following:

It is just "named", in the meaning that the number in front of the at-sign is the real chosen resolution for that mode, the two numbers behind the at-sign are the adressabiltiy. (look with the search of Gordo´s Print Blog: https://the-print-guide.blogspot.com/search?q=inkjet+resolution)

Just for curiosity: Are there any options to create own printing modes or renaming them?

Best

Ulrich
No, they are not adjustable by the user. I find it odd that the manual on the RIP wouldn't explain this setting. I will check out Gordo's article.
 

Correct Color

Well-known member
If you dig a little deeper, what you'll find is that all 'resolutions' using this type of designation are what is known as "contone" settings.

And what that means is that basically all the information about how and what the printer is doing as it's creating dots is not available to the RIP; it's all handled internally in the printer.

In fact, the setting you use as an example looks like it's from some sort of Epson printer, but typically they display with a -CT at the end, such as 720@720x1440-CT; the CT denotes contone.

The way all printer drivers and printer driver quality settings work with RIP's is that all the settings such as this are supplied to the RIP companies by the printer manufacturers. So these same quality settings for whatever printer you have will also exist in Caldera, or Fiery, or whatever; and I'll note that I don't know of any RIP manufacturer that explains them. They're provided by the printer manufacturer, and there they are.

But how that number breaks down is that the first number indicates the "process resolution", the second one indicates that horizontal print resolution, and the third one indicates the vertical print resolution. And what that means is that the "process resolution" is how the image is RIPped, and the print resolutions are how it is printed.

So it works out that the higher the process resolution, the more data in the actual printing image and conceivably the better quality of the print, but the longer it will take to RIP.



Mike Adams
Correct Color
 
Last edited:

kdw75

Well-known member
If you dig a little deeper, what you'll find is that all 'resolutions' using this type of designation are what is known as "contone" settings.

And what that means is that basically all the information about how and what the printer is doing as it's creating dots is not available to the RIP; it's all handled internally in the printer.

In fact, the setting you use as an example looks like it's from some sort of Epson printer, but typically they display with a -CT at the end, such as 720@720x1440-CT; the CT denotes contone.

The way all printer drivers and printer driver quality settings work with RIP's is that all the settings such as this are supplied to the RIP companies by the printer manufacturers. So these same quality settings for whatever printer you have will also exist in Caldera, or Fiery, or whatever; and I'll note that I don't know of any RIP manufacturer that explains them. They're provided by the printer manufacturer, and there they are.

But how that number breaks down is that the first number indicates the "process resolution", the second one indicates that horizontal print resolution, and the third one indicates the vertical print resolution. And what that means is that the "process resolution" is how the image is RIPped, and the print resolutions are how it is printed.

So it works out that the higher the process resolution, the more data in the actual printing image and conceivably the better quality of the print, but the longer it will take to RIP.



Mike Adams
Correct Color
The perfect explanation that I can understand. I have been using the "720@720x720 4 pass high quality" setting on our new printer for banners. Why on earth would they think to explain what all that means? They just tell you more passes are better and the bigger the first numbers the better. lol
 

So You Want to Invest In Inkjet

I Want to Invest in Inkjet, But…
Over the past few years I’ve watched a group of transactional and direct mail printers strategically shift from monochrome toner machines to full-color toner and inkjet presses. Most banished old black-only toner boxes but kept their color toner devices around because they anticipated needing both color inkjet and toner presses to meet customer needs. They were right then and continue to be right today. Because toner and inkjet can be better together. Read the Post

   
Top