Since support for Type 1 fonts is ending in January......

prepressdork

Well-known member
...I was wondering what other printers are doing in preparation for this (aside from converting fonts to another format)? Are you communicating this with your customers? What (if any) procedural changes are you making? For reprints (with changes), how will you handle existing files that use Type 1 fonts?

Best regards,
pd
 

prepressdork

Well-known member
Hi everyone, thank you for the replies. When writing my post, I had assumed that everyone would start converting their Type 1 fonts to other format in preparation for this change so it's not really what I am asking. I am asking about how you are going to handle this change beyond just converting fonts with XYZ software.

What procedural changes will you be making? Have you communicated this change to your customers? Will you offer to convert fonts for your customers? Things like that.

Best regards,
pd
 
Last edited:

scotts

Well-known member
We have been telling our customers for the past year about the impending doom. And have seen them making changes in their files.

And for the folks converting the fonts, you better read the licensing agreement, as all the ones I've read state that you are not supposed to do that. But I know, us printing folks have not always followed the licensing agreement to the letter but more to the feel of what it is intended to be. Me included in all my years (which now I think about it are too many to admit too).
 

DevostD

Member
Since I first started getting the warning pop-up in Adobe Software I've slowly been transitioning client files to newer versions or alternate versions of Open Type fonts. It's been a bit of a chore especially when working on repeat artwork that has changes. I keep a cheat sheet replacement font table so that I can be consistent when editing client files. I was to a point this summer that I removed most old fronts from my workstation so that I'm forced to change them to something else.
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
Since I first started getting the warning pop-up in Adobe Software I've slowly been transitioning client files to newer versions or alternate versions of Open Type fonts. It's been a bit of a chore especially when working on repeat artwork that has changes. I keep a cheat sheet replacement font table so that I can be consistent when editing client files. I was to a point this summer that I removed most old fronts from my workstation so that I'm forced to change them to something else.
I can remember when . . . . .
the software you used allowed you to create that replacement table for automatic re-use.
Sigh.
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
I can remember when . . . . .
the software you used allowed you to create that replacement table for automatic re-use.
Sigh.
Wow - 5 hours and no reply.
Seriously - the bloatware that is Adobe software (because we really need it updated for 'features' constantly just like micro$bloat) SHOULD have this feature.

They should even be able to sell it for crissakes.
 

michaelejahn

Well-known member
Wow - 5 hours and no reply.
Seriously - the bloatware that is Adobe software (because we really need it updated for 'features' constantly just like micro$bloat) SHOULD have this feature.

They should even be able to sell it for crissakes.
Chriscozi - have you ever worked for a vendor ISV/OEM ? My guess is probably not. Typeface ownership / patents / copywrites on fonts ( or better said, somehow wrangling them within a software application or RIP/DFE is a losing proposition. Before we could embed the fount within that PDF/X file ( THAT YOU CUSTOMER SHOULD BE DOING NOW SINCE THEY CAN ) - we needed to have the DFOs ( Definitive Font Outline ) loaded into the RIP - in the case of KANJI type fonts, the wee MASSIVE ( so, when AFGA would sell a RIP in Japan or China, it was VERY expensive and came on multiple large hard drives )

We do not have this issue when you don't need 10,000 glyphs in your fonts character set.

It is 100% solve is the designer save the file to be exchanged as a PDF/X file.
if they are too ignorant to build a proper PDF/X file - or - there is some complex flexo type ( complex trapping / distortion / spot color overprinting ) workflow where you require they send the original Adobe Illustrator file - then - as it relates to fonts - they need to INCLUDE them when they send the file ( totally legal to do that as long as you only use these fonts with THAT customer.

So, totally solvable 100% of the time.
 

chriscozi

Well-known member
Chriscozi - have you ever worked for a vendor ISV/OEM ? My guess is probably not.
Not as a programmer. But I still have my Red, Green, Blue Postscript books.
Typeface ownership / patents / copywrites on fonts ( or better said, somehow wrangling them within a software application or RIP/DFE is a losing proposition.
How so?
Is this just because Adobe/Copyright won't ALLOW the replacement or because it is exceedingly difficult? This matters.
I suppose the Serif Affinity products are suffering from this in a way.
Although they DO allow replacements just not 'Auto' replacements.
 

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