Coca-Cola to Launch Paper Bottles

prwhite

Administrator
Staff member
Technology developed by Paboco —the paper bottle company—is designed to create recyclable bottles made of sustainably sourced varieties of wood that are capable of resisting liquids, CO2 & oxygen, and are suitable for liquid goods such as carbonated or still drinks & beauty products.

The current prototype consists of a paper shell with a recyclable plastic lining & cap made from 100% recycled PET. However, the company’s ultimate goal is to produce a bottle that can be recycled as paper. Coca-Cola’s global vision is to achieve a “World Without Waste”—the company has pledged to ensure all of its packaging is collected, recycled, or re-used by 2030.

Partnering with Paboco, the trial is scheduled to take place in Q2-2021, and will involve the plant-based AdeZ drink being offered to 2,000 consumers in Hungary, through a partnership with Kifli.hu—one of Hungary’s fastest growing online grocery retailers. The trial is expected to provide insight & feedback to see how the paper bottle prototype performs as packaging, and what consumers think & feel about it.
 

gordo

Well-known member

But glass is already 100% recyclable and can be recycled endlessly without loss in quality or purity. So ????​

 

scotts

Well-known member
I can't help but think of all the kids in Sunnyvale Trailer Park throwing paper bottles instead of glass bottles at Ricky, Julian and Bubbles.
 

gordo

Well-known member
The only way it gonna work if you place a price onto the bottles, like we have on the aluminum cans.
We have a price - a deposit - here in NAmerica on plastic bottles - also on some glass bottles. The deposit is paid back when you return the bottle.
 

Puch

Well-known member
We have a price - a deposit - here in NAmerica on plastic bottles - also on some glass bottles. The deposit is paid back when you return the bottle.
And how much is it? Unless it's an amount visible by the naked eye, it won't work.

When I was a child (1980's in the commie block) we had a 'real' deposit on glass bottles. Back then, plastic and aluminum wasn't a widespread packaging material behind the iron curtain. It was mainly our (children's) duty to bring back bottles and paper to the collecting points.Those materials had so much value that it was our 'pocket money'. I remember that such a 'bottle recycle run' resulted in a sum which was enough for a whole week's ice cream consumption. Actually my grandma had a 'pressure' on her to find even the last empty bottle in the closet. :)
 

gordo

Well-known member
And how much is it? Unless it's an amount visible by the naked eye, it won't work.
Where I live (Western Canada) the deposit is typically 10 - 20 cents (24-48 HUF) per bottle (plastic or glass).

It's enough money that homeless people often return empties to supplement their incomes:

Homeless.jpg
 

Puch

Well-known member
That sounds like a solution. I'm waiting for the EU to put into code a similar legislation. Until then, we're choking in rubbish.
 

scotts

Well-known member
Yes, here in Michigan, US, the deposit on bottles for caffeinated drinks and some others, for plastic, aluminum and glass is 10 cents per. Homeless, people with low paying jobs, kids, and some families in general return bottles to supplement their income too. Some do it as a way to clean up areas, and then use it as a way of getting paid for said activity. And to keep areas clean.
 

tngcas

Well-known member
Oregon has this too. Since I live right on the border of Oregon/Washington - there's a lot of people who cross the border into Washington and will wait until ppl put their recycling out on the curb and then pick thru them to get the bottles/cans to take back to Oregon and get the $0.10 per can deposit. Washington doesn't allow for individual can returns like Oregon does.

Some people get really upset about it because they don't like random people picking thru their cans, which I do understand. I, however, appreciate the initiate to try to do something to earn money vs nothing. I always tell people it's easy to solve if you just put the cans in a separate bag and set it next to your bin they'll just take them and not go thru your can.
 

kansasquaker

Well-known member
"if you just put the cans in a separate bag and set it next to your bin"
Learned that lesson with scrap metal here. We sort it for them now because they leave a mess otherwise. I'm all for the initiative, but part of that is cleaning up after yourself too.
 

De-Inking

Avanti
Sustainable Printing Goes Far Beyond Using FSC Certified or Recycled Paper
This informative paper on deinking: demand, principles, problems and solutions also explains why printing technologies are not all equally compatible with paper recycling systems; and why just a small fraction of printed material in the paper can cause difficulties.
Link To White Paper

   
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