Ink Calculation Formula

pepsi710

Member
Hi All,

I am try to insert one formula in system to calculate INK for particular to required
but I to cal on basis of
1.Printed Area (in inch)
2.Total Impression / sheets
3.substrate --> 1. Coated , 2. Uncoated
4.Print Type -->1.Solid , 2. Half-tone

in this formula printed area and total impression i can auto fetch from system for new printing but it difficult to decide Substrate and print type.

Please have other way of ink calculation. Please help me

thanks
 

dwanehollands

Well-known member
Spanks

Spanks

Hi Pepsi710,

There is a particular formula that ink manufacturers use called SPANKS.

Years ago I got them to fax me the formula, but for the life of me I can't find it. Strangely enough I actually went looking for it the other day before I read your post.

It's something along the lines of:

S - Sheets
P - Paper (I think it has values for coated, uncoated, matt etc)
A -
N - Number of sides or something
K -
S -

Anyway I'm sure someone can truly fill in the blanks for you.

It's not a perfect formula, but I understand it's probably the best one...
 

gordo

Well-known member
"SPANKS"...must be an Ozzie thang:)
check out:
So you th(Ink) you got it right? - News Archive - Print21
Also...from the old ink mileage guess-t-mater:
1 pound of K ink will cover about 380,000 sq inches on coated stock
1 pound of Process (or Pantone) ink will cover about 340,000 sq inches on coated stock

1 pound of K ink will cover about 275,000 sq inches on uncoated stock
1 pound of Process (or Pantone) ink will cover about 220,000 sq inches on uncoated stock
For web presses allow an additional 10%.
or...
Ink usage for a sheetfed printer is about 2% of gross earning per year. I.e. A $5 million dollar a year printer consumes about $100,000 in ink.

Your mileage may vary :)

best, gordo

my print blog here: Quality In Print
 

pepsi710

Member
"SPANKS"...must be an Ozzie thang:)
check out:
So you th(Ink) you got it right? - News Archive - Print21
Also...from the old ink mileage guess-t-mater:
1 pound of K ink will cover about 380,000 sq inches on coated stock
1 pound of Process (or Pantone) ink will cover about 340,000 sq inches on coated stock

1 pound of K ink will cover about 275,000 sq inches on uncoated stock
1 pound of Process (or Pantone) ink will cover about 220,000 sq inches on uncoated stock
For web presses allow an additional 10%.
or...
Ink usage for a sheetfed printer is about 2% of gross earning per year. I.e. A $5 million dollar a year printer consumes about $100,000 in ink.

Your mileage may vary :)

best, gordo

my print blog here: Quality In Print


thanks
I tried to put this formula in system.
after calculating try to match with original usage by printing that particular jobs
to finds variance should not be more than 10%

thanks again
 

pepsi710

Member
Frd i tried to working with above suggested formula but the result so satisfactory can there other way to calculated ink
bases sheet print area
 

Morning Flight

Well-known member
... variance should not be more than 10%
I think that's putting too fine a point on it. If you can come up with a universal formula that gets to within 10% of reality, run with it, Pepsi710. Actually, for small to medium size shops, you'll find the largest variable to be the type of ink used. Namely, oil-based versus rubber-based (or some other form of slow-skinning ink). With oil-based inks, your biggest waste on short runs will always be having to discard that hard top layer. No estimating program can account for that.

FYI, the attachments show what Morning Flight calculates for ink consumption on 5,000 8-1/2x11 Newsletters, 25% black ink coverage, on both uncoated and coated paper.

Hal Heindel
www.morningflight.com
 

Attachments

HecTiK

Active member
We normally just figure about 1/4# per 1000 impressions on the web heatsets. comes pretty close most times unless its really heavy coverage.
 

made4print

Member
Hi,

We are testing an online PDF application (called PrintCALC) that we've built to report on the percentage coverage (CMYK) of print-ready PDF files, Is this something that may help? Its available here: http://printcalc.net/

Your feedback appreciated.

Thanks

Mark Redman
Made4Print Limited
 

gordo

Well-known member
Hi,
We are testing an online PDF application (called PrintCALC) that we've built to report on the percentage coverage (CMYK) of print-ready PDF files, Is this something that may help? Its available here: http://printcalc.net/
Your feedback appreciated.
Interestingly it doesn't work with PDFs directly out of Photoshop but does seem to work with PDFs out of InDesign. Wasn't able to view individual channels though.

best, gordon p
 

made4print

Member
Ink Calculation Formula

Ink Calculation Formula

Hi Gordon,

Not sure why photoshop would produce different PDF's? I am not a Photoshop guru but is it possible to select Print Profiles in Photoshop like InDesign?

With regards the individual channels, there does seem to be an issue with some browsers.

Thanks very much for the feedback, will investigate these things further.

Mark
 

gjk008

Member
Apart from spanks is there any other formula to calculate ink used wrt the coverage area. What is the significance of denominator number 353 in the formula.

Thanks
GJK
 
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mazengh

Well-known member
researching...

researching...

i've been researching this topic... it's hard to find information about this subject... i lately got in touch with someone at GATF, and i've been promised to be helped... still awaiting... i will update in this thread....

P.S.: i am a prepress guy, but currently learning offset printing in college :), hence the GATF help... this research i am doing is in order to create an ink estimator webpage... i will release the code once i am done...
 

rising

Member
Hi,

With my past experience i have worked on calculating INK requirement for a certain density/area using Printability tester ... Am sure i can get back more details any one intrested
 

rising

Member
Ink Requirement

Ink Requirement

Hi,
To test the dry properties of an ink as e.g. Color, Density, and a print on substrate is necessary. After drying the desired property can be measured. Most of this printability tests are performed on the base of a known ink film thickness on the printing form (printing disc). The real amount of ink on the paper is not known. In many cases, it is better to know exactly the amount of ink on the paper because small differences can influence the property too much. For that reason, the ink transfer is calculated in g/m2 from the difference in weight of printing form before and after printing and size of the print.

Pls go thru attached file..
 

Attachments

kakarla

New member
hi this is srinivas
i read your massage about ink formula.
Please send that formula as printable format form me.
thank you
 

cosnet

Member
We found a program that is most useful as well. It is not exactly for amount of ink by volume but is helpful for seeing benefits of GCR programs, etc. We use it as a 3rd party verification of ORIS Ink Saver. It is called PressPercent and can be found at Excourse PressPerCent "http://www.excourse.com/presspercent"
It runs in demo mode forever but is limited to a single plate size. It correlates ink key settings and produces nice reports.
Regards,
Bruce
 
Last edited:

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