Polyester plates printed on Laser printers

Kingfisher

New member
Kingfisher

Kingfisher

As to the question about poly plates and laser printers (the best plates and the best printers), there is no one answer. I've found that the real inexpensive way to get started is to use the HP 5000 or HP 5100 printer, along with poly plates supplied by one of several companies. Although the best known poly plate is probably the Hurst Smartplate, one can save a bit by using the DAA Genie plates ... which is exactly the same plate. So are the Baseline brand plates, I believe. Xante plates (Myriad) are for the Xante platemaker ... a little better quality but more money. If you have a Xante, there is now a cheaper "X" plate which claims to work as well, but I don't think it's quite as good. If you try a poly plate on your 5000 printer and things don't work out right away, don't be surprised. Things have to be just right. The printer has to be in great condition, the settings have to be correct (slowest speed, hottest setting, proper dpi, etc.). Also, many printers have found that baking the plate a bit is a real key. Try running it through a second time while blank. Some inventive folks even bake their plates a few seconds in a shrink wrap tunnel. There are also several plate prep chemicals from Hurst, Xante, DAA and others to help prevent background tinting and toner scatter, and to protect the image area. There's more ... too much to put here. I have a sheet which which I prepared which spells out many of the problems and offers solutions. Folks can let me know if they want me to send one out.

Please send the solution
 

graficworx

Well-known member
Please send the solution

And if you run out of plate prep, you can use a light application of SoftScrub paste without bleach, works just as good as the Hurst or other plate preps in removing toning. I'm sure anyone who had used laser poly plates for a few years has weird tricks like this.

If your anywhere near Seattle I might be able to come by and give you a hand.
 

Kingfisher

New member
Well I finally got the plates to stay clean with the use of alchol, but the plates break down almost as soon as you start the press.
Also I have purchased a Xante platemaker 3 same results.
Kingfisher
Kitsap Printing
Poulsbo WA
 

OkiTech

Well-known member
Well we have used HP 5000 / 5100 for number of years with plates lasting 10,000+ for line art and 4000-7000 with halftones so it can be done. You have to make sure that printer is perfect especially fuser. I print the plate and than send a blank page and run it again this way toner being cooked better on to the plate. Your alcohol actually works against you- it does dissolves the image as you run. Talk to your paper supplier - they should be able to help you to optimaze you printer. I understand you already have the printer but we are selling our HP 5100 in case you are interested. We bought new press and it came with Xante Platemaker 4 so HP is no longer needed. I have made hundreds of plates on it so you can be sure it does the job. I can also make a plate on it and ship it to you so you can try.... Let me know if you are interested othervise Ebay it goes.
 

Blair Wolfe

Active member
If you have a Xante platemaker, and are using it corectly, you should have no problem. We have run that way exclusively for 15 years. Backgroung toner scater is always there, and can be rmoved by a good pate cleaner like LaserKleen EX
 
Although plate manufacturers will say that their products will work on many printers and copiers, in fact, the only printer we've found to work consistently well in the HP5000 and HP5100, both no longer being made but both still readily available for a few hundred dollars as used and reconditioned machines. (I can get one for you through a company that reconditions them if you are interested.)

As for the plates, the most known brand is probably the Hurst SmartPlate, which we sell, but it is exactly the same plate as those sold by other names. I'd recommend the DAA Genie Polyester II Laser Plate which is the best bargain. They come in a variety of sizes, 100 per box. Samples are available. If you want to try them, give me a call (1-877-427-5546). That's the toll-free number to my company, Printing Equipment & Supply, in Minnesota.

There are also options, just to make things a little more confusing, including Xante and Okidata products. Again, I either sell this stuff or know a bit about them. Both entail considerably more outlay at the beginning because you are buying new machines, but both are specifically made to do plates for the printing industry and thus work a little bit better and come with some warranties.

It comes down to budget. But why not try the HP first. A lot of people use these machines successfully after they've learned the tricks and idiosyncracies of these machines. I have tip sheet which spells some of these out, if you are anyone else cares to have one. Let me know. Larry, Printing Equipment & Supply

Larry, I would love a copy of your tip sheet please. My email is sassymac at comcast dot net Thanks, Sherry
 
Do you have any recommendations as to where to get the best deals on the OEM toner? I have a reman. toner that came with the HP5100, but it may be causing a bit of a breakup on a certain area of the sheet, so I'd like to rule that out before sending the machine back. Any help would be appreciated.

Hi guys, we use HP 5100 with Xante Myriad plates - the best results out of all.
As was mentioned before - you must double fuse the plate - after imaging send a blank page (or with the dot somewhere where it does no matter) and run it again.
Another important thing - printer must be set to "cardstock"
Driver must be "PostScript" also comfigured to "cardstock in by-pass tray"
Resolution must be set to "pro-1200"

Printer have to be in absolutelly great shape - fuser, transfer roller, etc.
Cartridge better OEM.
Everything works fine to about 25 - 40 % of estimated life than some quality loss noticed.
I guess for simplicity and general cost of plate making it is no big deal at all.
Problem with the cartridge that Charge roller picks-up too much of some-kind residue from plates and than quality loss occur. I am a Business equipment service engineer and can easy dis-assembly cartridge and clean that roller, but generelly you would have to change over a half full cartridge to keep quality on the top of what it can be using this system.
Also for longer runs and better registration we use "repositionable glue", just spray back of the plate. It makes Make-ready to be a killer - plate have to unclamped and peeled off everytime for adjustment, but once set with run nice - no stretching, close in register.
 

jpfulton248

Well-known member
Why does the printer need to be postscript?

I'm not super experienced with any of this at all but I have been running a 5000 for 8 years and now just recently a 5100 to print boards that we use to shoot plates and run a Ryobi 3200/Itek 975PFA (i'm not the press guy). I believe the reason is control of the LPI... at least that is the reason we have. A postscript printer which will come with a PPD file (or you can find one by download) allows you to have more control of the detailed settings and if you are going to print offset you need to be able to control the line screen (lines per inch - LPI). PPDs can be used with InDesign, Acrobat, Illustrator and Photoshop and some other design programs that I have no experience with.
 

OkiTech

Well-known member
Not a printer, a print driver must be post script. A regular PCL driver will allow to print only 600 dpi and as said before, much less control over whats being printed.
 
We tried the laser printer to plate (psotscript) and we had mixed results and so purchased a Xante and it was almost as bad. Dealing with lead edge toning and toner scatter, etc... it was a mess. we ended up getting a Kimosetter 410. HUGE difference for us. All of our pressmen love those plates on the small presses. You can pick these up fairly cheap used... like on Ebay. We have a direct to metal platemaker also but the Kimo is faster and much cheaper for those simple 1 & 2 color jobs on the smaller 9910 AB Dick and 3302 Ryobi's we have.
 

OkiTech

Well-known member
I thought we were discussing HP LaserJet 5100 which is a post script printer given that it has a post script driver available.
 

jpfulton248

Well-known member
I thought we were discussing HP LaserJet 5100 which is a post script printer given that it has a post script driver available.

Nevermind... miscommunication. I was just responding to dynamicprinter's comment where he asked why he needs a postscript printer... the answer is in order to control detailed printer functions which are controlled with a postscript driver... Can't use a postscript driver unless you have a postscript printer.
 
PS Driver for HP 5100

PS Driver for HP 5100

ers (the best plates and the best printers), there is no one answer. I've found that the real inexpensive way to get started is to use the HP 5000 or HP 5100 printer, along with poly plates supplied by one of several companies. Although the best known poly plate is probably the Hurst Smartplate, one can save a bit by using the DAA Genie plates ... which is exactly the same plate. So are the Baseline brand plates, I believe. Xante plates (Myriad) are for the Xante platemaker ... a little better quality but more money. If you have a Xante, there is now a cheaper "X" plate which claims to work as well, but I don't think it's quite as good. If you try a poly plate on your 5000 printer and things don't work out right away, don't be surprised. Things have to be just right. The printer has to be in great condition, the settings have to be correct (slowest speed, hottest setting, proper dpi, etc.). Also, many printers have found that baking the plate a bit is a real key. Try running it through a second time while blank. Some inventive folks even bake their plates a few seconds in a shrink wrap tunnel. There are also several plate prep chemicals from Hurst, Xante, DAA and others to help prevent background tinting and toner scatter, and to protect the image area. There's more ... too much to put here. I have a sheet which which I prepared which spells out many of the problems and offers solutions. Folks can let me know if they want me to send one out.[/QUOTE]
 

dynamicprinter

Well-known member
I am using an HP 5100 with AB Dick or Baseline plates with AB Dick fountain solution for laserplates and 4oz Alcohol. Printer was rebuilt, my biggest problem is toner scatter. Printer is set to lightest toner setting and on cardstock. I print the plate and run it through a second time with a dot in the corner so the toner will bond good. I use plate cleaner but still get a toning I believe from toner scatter. Blanket becomes very dirty during run. Any ideas?
 

jpfulton248

Well-known member
I am using an HP 5100 with AB Dick or Baseline plates with AB Dick fountain solution for laserplates and 4oz Alcohol. Printer was rebuilt, my biggest problem is toner scatter. Printer is set to lightest toner setting and on cardstock. I print the plate and run it through a second time with a dot in the corner so the toner will bond good. I use plate cleaner but still get a toning I believe from toner scatter. Blanket becomes very dirty during run. Any ideas?

Make sure the plates are not kept in a hot/dry location. I saw a guy put his plates in a large tupperware container then place a bowl on top of the plates with a wet sponge in the bowl and then he put the lid on the container.
 

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