Printing in the US costs 3x as much as in Europe?

LokiL

Member
That's helpful info about the large trim wastage. It's the sort of answer I've been looking for / wondering about.

Thanks a lot for finding that quote for me. It's indeed about three times the prices in Western Europe.

On your advice I'll broaden the types of specs I'm looking and see what difference it makes.

Appreciate your help everyone.
 

AP90

Well-known member
Are we just getting screwed over by paper companies here? I can’t see that being the case because if so you’d have companies buying container loads from Europe and saving money.
 

PricelineNegotiator

Well-known member
Are we just getting screwed over by paper companies here? I can’t see that being the case because if so you’d have companies buying container loads from Europe and saving money.
I highly doubt the paper companies are screwing us. If they were, we would see crazy things like paper prices being raised multiple times per year from each mill! They're totally being our best buds.
 

kheslin

Member
It can also be an issue of finding the right printer for the project. This is the type of job we do every day. Our pricing FOB Green Bay, WI is approx. $1,450 for 5,000 and $2,200 for 10,000.
 

davarino

Well-known member
We were looking at 90gsm, 5,000 to 10,000 qty, and yes saddle not perfect bound. Finished to standard A6, which is similar to the measurements above yes.

If there's anything weird about that spec for the US then I'd love to hear it, from anyone. But again, the price is 300% of what we pay in other Western countries, so it would have to be something quite poignant to make that much difference.

Thanks everyone for your interest in the thread. Just trying to get my head around the situation.
What are the specs? Paper (coated, uncoated, specialty such as groundwood?), imaging (4CP, PMS, Black?), size (spread and folded sizes) as an absolute minimum.

I'd love to give you an example quote from out here in the West. NYC prices tend to be much higher, but if I show something maybe someone in the NYC area would feel like showing what they'd do on pricing.;):cool:
 

gregbatch

Well-known member
It can also be an issue of finding the right printer for the project. This is the type of job we do every day. Our pricing FOB Green Bay, WI is approx. $1,450 for 5,000 and $2,200 for 10,000.
That was really my point. If that's not their niche, it will cost extra. Good price. I will be adding you to my supplier list.
 

LokiL

Member
It can also be an issue of finding the right printer for the project. This is the type of job we do every day. Our pricing FOB Green Bay, WI is approx. $1,450 for 5,000 and $2,200 for 10,000.
This is a clear step forward, thank you Could you email me that quote please? loki [AT] instereomag.com

But yes, even in Europe you do need to find the right printer for the spec to make it work price-wise. My colleague assures me that he has tried around 30 companies though, so I was beginning to wonder if we were ever going to do better.

What are the specs? Paper (coated, uncoated, specialty such as groundwood?), imaging (4CP, PMS, Black?), size (spread and folded sizes) as an absolute minimum.
Thanks for your help. What we usually print on is called 'silk' in Europe. It's somewhere between gloss and matte. However I'm willing to be flexible on this (and the other specs) if it means getting a cost-effective product in the US. Yes always 4/full color. The size as I say is A6, but we'd be willing to look at something else close to this if, again, it makes the product viable to make.
 

Color Optimized?

Ink
by Noel Ward, Editor@Large
Color is in demand in all types of documents, making color management a critical part of Digital Printing 5.0. Managing color on one device/press can be an easy task with the correct tools and processes. But managing color to ensure printed pages are consistent and repeatable across the different substrates and color gamuts of toner and inkjet can be a much bigger challenge. Properly implemented color management workflows can help achieve consistent color results across multiple devices. Although many end-customers are claiming satisfaction with “pleasing color,” two challenges are still in play. Link to Article

 
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