Processor Less Plates

Raymond Ramirez

Well-known member
Good afternoon folks,
I wanted to take a few minutes outs of my day to post information and my experience with Processor Less Plates. Basic understanding, Theory and hopefully some people can add their two cents to this post.

The plate in general has its good points. For one, no processor, prepress footprint greatly diminished, no harsh chemicals, no water and amongst other things no need for cleaning the processor...

Things to watch out for. Light constraints, latent image (hard to see), improper roll-up, being properly educated on the emulsions and most important exposure / curves incorrect.

In my dealings with the major manufacturers. the exposure and curves play a huge roll on how the plate is going to work.

improper exposure will decrease run length both ways... over exposure and under exposure sometimes has the same effect...

How does the emulsion come off the plate?

theoretically the dampener roller hits the plate with the right mixture of water and fountain solution. Then ink form drops a layer of ink as the tack of the ink pulls the emulsion into the paper.

The first sheets should look like blinding. or heavy Emulsification If they are not that means the emulsion will end up somewhere in the ink water train. No Bueno

The main complaint I hear is “I have to run my water high to clear the plate and then run everything low. Im running my ink to heavy”... Bad exposure or curves will cause this. Unbeknownst to the pressman, running his water to low will cause wear out the plate prematurely. The lack of protection the water gives the plate is virtually nonexistent because he is combating an over exposed plate or wrong curve applied.

This is about 90 percent of all issues I have encountered or I have come under fire.

Especially, a shop that comes off of a positive acting plate going to a negative PLP acting plate

Process Less Plate?
Non-Process Plate?
Processless Plate?

I know must be a difference in the wording?
 
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pabney

Well-known member
Hello Ray,
It has been a long time. Hope all is well.
I do have a question about these plates. Where does the emulsion go that falls outside of the paper.
Say I have a 40 inch plate, and I am running 25 inch paper. That leaves 7.5 inches on each side of the paper. Where does that emulsion go?
I have been wanting to talk Ken into trying these plates, but was not sure about the above question.
 
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Magnus59

Well-known member
Hello Ray,
It has been a long time. Hope all is well.
I do have a question about these plates. Where does the emulsion go that falls outside of the paper.
Say I have a 40 inch plate, and I am running 25 inch paper. That leaves 7.5 inches on each side of the paper. Where does that emulsion go?
I have been wanting to talk Ken into trying these plates, but was not sure about the above question.
We ran an extensive trial of Sonora plates on a Speedmaster 74-8
We ended up going back to a wet process plate. The main reasons the press operators disliked using them were:
Any contamination from the load rollers on the press would prevent the emulsion from being removed in those areas, eg ink from the previous set of plates being unmounted.
Emulsion build up on the ends of the rollers, we run mainly 650mm stock, which leaves 45mm at each end of the rollers. The operators were having to take all the rollers out of the press and scrub off the excess emulsion build up.
Kodak tell us we are one of only 2 shops left in our area still using wet plates, so others are apparently not having the same issues.
 
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CSF

Well-known member
Hello Ray

As you know, calcium contamination is a MAJOR issue facing DOP plates. Blinding and excessive plate wear are directly tied to the calcium effect.

If you are the SoCal Ray I think you are, my associate Paul J. contacted you awhile back because you expressed interest on LinkedIn in seeing for yourself the dramatic improvements in running DOP plates after using my revolutionary new roller cleaner.

Have you proceeded with any testing or observations in regard to this ?

Last week alone, at least six Texas and California accounts of a major plate manufacturer/graphics supplier that you may be affiliated with, have reduced or eliminated problems running DOP plates simply by changing the method by which they clean their rollers.

Proper and thorough maintenance of rollers will improve plate performance, be they DOP or not. Fact.
 

Raymond Ramirez

Well-known member
Hello Ray,
It has been a long time. Hope all is well.
I do have a question about these plates. Where does the emulsion go that falls outside of the paper.
Say I have a 40 inch plate, and I am running 25 inch paper. That leaves 7.5 inches on each side of the paper. Where does that emulsion go?
I have been wanting to talk Ken into trying these plates, but was not sure about the above question.
Hi Paul

Long Time no talk to... I hope all is well.

Ar first I thought it would lead to the back cylinders... But if Ink and water are right it will be encapsulated by small ink particles and go back into the fountain train (They say Suspended, whatever that means) If the pressmen are doing their job and cleaning it should not be an issue. CFS above Stated about calcium is a major issue and DOP plates do work if you are doing the proper cleanup. Calcium Slayer is actually the best out for getting proper roller conditioning and maintenance. I also strongly recommend that you get a Brix unit and keep the alcohol under 2 when using a 2 step fountain.
 

Raymond Ramirez

Well-known member
We ran an extensive trial of Sonora plates on a Speedmaster 74-8
We ended up going back to a wet process plate. The main reasons the press operators disliked using them were:
Any contamination from the load rollers on the press would prevent the emulsion from being removed in those areas, eg ink from the previous set of plates being unmounted.
Emulsion build up on the ends of the rollers, we run mainly 650mm stock, which leaves 45mm at each end of the rollers. The operators were having to take all the rollers out of the press and scrub off the excess emulsion build up.
Kodak tell us we are one of only 2 shops left in our area still using wet plates, so others are apparently not having the same issues.
Let me get back to you... I think we had the same issue, I remember we did something to fix this issue but can't remember, Let me look at my notes
 

Cher

Member
hi, how are you?
So, do you recommend to use processless CTP plate? As my company boss and R&D invest and developed processless plates, I don't know whether it can be widely accepted and use in the market.
 

Cher

Member
hi, how are you?
So, do you recommend to use processless CTP plate? As my company boss and R&D invest and developed processless plates, I don't know whether it can be widely accepted and use in the market.
BTW, I will re-print your use feeling on my linkedin. Thank you for the article.
 

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