Ricoh C9110 recommendations

ksherrod

Well-known member
I have had ZERO luck running #10's on our 9100. Ricoh says it will ... but our sales rep told us beforehand that it was very difficult. I know there are people out there doing it but I haven't been able to figure it out yet
Yeah #10s and small sizes on the J75 sometime work, but sometimes wrinkle, or jam constantly, or you need to open the flaps. Usually a hassle so we get tired of messing with it. We have other printers to run envelopes but they are much slower and more expensive to use. Its unfortunate because 9x12s and 10x13s usually rock on the J75.

Was just curious because we are looking at maybe a replacement envelope printing solution and thought we might be able to kill two birds with one Ricoh.
 

Shawnd

Well-known member
I have yet to get #10's to work right in my 7110 either, even with the flap out they run like poop. 6x9's and up do run through it ok.
 

deckm00@yahoo.com

Well-known member
I have yet to get #10's to work right in my 7110 either, even with the flap out they run like poop. 6x9's and up do run through it ok.
Yeah as they say, your mileage may vary. This may really actually be one of those cases of "it's the paper". I've had customers on both 9100's and 7100's run #10's quite well and others who give up. I think a lot of it depends on the quality of the envelopes themselves, as in 'you get what you pay for'. Of course I'm assuming you are disabling skew detect and double-sheet feed? You might try Columbian White Wove 24# (#CO125) but only 100 at a time and with a lower process speed. Same with National Envelope White Wove (03982) Printmaster, also 24#. There are a couple others that Ricoh has validated but the common denominator seems to be 24#. These things are marketed as having the ability to print onto envelopes but they're not envelope printers.
 

gregbatch

Well-known member
The 9100/9110 is the only machine we were able to run heavily textured stocks on. We're talking Classic Columns and coarse felts. We haven't found a stock we can't run. Quality and registration are incredible. My one and only complaint is the cables in the drawers could be heavier. Overload with a heavy coated stock and you can break them. I haven't seen another machine that could offer so much for the money.
 

msaeger

Well-known member
I have had ZERO luck running #10's on our 9100. Ricoh says it will ... but our sales rep told us beforehand that it was very difficult. I know there are people out there doing it but I haven't been able to figure it out yet
What jam code do you get? There will be JXXX on the top of the jam screen.
 

InvisSoul

Well-known member
I have had ZERO luck running #10's on our 9100. Ricoh says it will ... but our sales rep told us beforehand that it was very difficult. I know there are people out there doing it but I haven't been able to figure it out yet
I've had had very little success with running #10 envelopes on our C7110. Any square, catalog or I can't only suggest that you try to run it flap open with the flap being the tail edge. As long as you have the minimum 5.5" for the length you should be able to run.
 

Shawnd

Well-known member
The flap open is what kills #10's for me, I have tried many brands including printmaster and they all stop on the vacuum belt right before the fuser and right after the transfer roller if they get past the vacuum drawer feed.
 

Manafaith

Well-known member
The 9100/9110 is the only machine we were able to run heavily textured stocks on. We're talking Classic Columns and coarse felts. We haven't found a stock we can't run. Quality and registration are incredible. My one and only complaint is the cables in the drawers could be heavier. Overload with a heavy coated stock and you can break them. I haven't seen another machine that could offer so much for the money.
Yah, we have had our 9100 for about 6 months and I think the techs have replaced the cables at least once in all of the drawers so far, maybe twice in a couple. It does print Classic Columns almost better than our offset does. It truly does an amazing job on heavy textures
 

bruceprint

Well-known member
Anyone use one of these Ricoh for envelopes...#10, A2, A7, etc? I find the J75 to not be that great except for larger envelopes.
Once we got the 9110 we started to run more envelopes through it. Had really good luck with #10, A2, A7. We run the envelopes both ways. One is when we buy open flap, second is when we open them ourselves before we run. Small lifts in two trays works good for us.
 

kev_24

New member
The two production workhorses Ricoh Pro C9100 and C9110 will help the customers to migrate additional volumes from offset to digital. Both devices boast a maximum recommended monthly volume of 1Million A4 pages, as well as high print speed of 110ppm and 130ppm.
 

TheProcessIStheproduct

Well-known member
Ricoh has the hot hand these days, I have been indigo customer for a decade, but seriously considering the switch, HP getting hammered in my local market, they are still tone deaf, whenever high price of machine and service cost are brought up all they want to talk about is fluorescent pink and high value static cling jobs, but average Joe customer that needs 100 flyers doesn’t care what u print it on, they just want it fast and cheap
 

tpmar

Well-known member
Ricoh has the hot hand these days, I have been indigo customer for a decade, but seriously considering the switch, HP getting hammered in my local market, they are still tone deaf, whenever high price of machine and service cost are brought up all they want to talk about is fluorescent pink and high value static cling jobs, but average Joe customer that needs 100 flyers doesn’t care what u print it on, they just want it fast and cheap
You are so right. We were with Indigo for 10 years, my 9100 is faster, cheaper, and much easier to maintain, and like I mentioned before the quality on coated stock is better than my series 2 Indigo although I would say the uncoated looked a little better on it than the Ricoh. It's great having a life with no blankets, no PIPs, no scorotrons, no ink tanks, no imaging oil, no cleaning station, etc.......
 

ShortRunMagazines

Well-known member
We have several C9110's and like them... we have over 9 million clicks (18 million letter) on one machine alone. They run well, need service, but at that volume, anything would. A lot better then the C901's and they were better then anything from the big red X we had before (including an iGen 4). On the subject of the 9110. I would take one any day over an iGen 4.
 

Santa

Well-known member
MY C7110X has a 5th station. White/Clear/Neon Pink/Neon Yellow/ and a black light UV for security. It's our first true digital and we have been loving it.
 

gsbatch

Active member
Hi, I am trying to understand a rough price point for Ricoh C9110. Appreciate your help here.
The 9110 is a substantial amount over the 9100. Think 3.2k plus .035. Google for state contracts on copiers and you can get good price onfo on most any machine. List and what they can really sell it for.
 

_socket

Well-known member
Price depends on how good of a negotiator you are. I would say if you've got a hungry sales guy who needs numbers for his quarter it could be had around the 6 figure mark (+- 10% or +20 or +30).

We decided on the Konica C6100. The Intelligent Quality Optimizer plus the dedicated 29" feed drawer sold us. We love automation and time is money. There are pros and cons for both machines. I like the flat toner on the Ricoh better, but it has a hard time with trail edge transfer on 300-400 GSM paper. We lost almost .5" on both trail edges.
 

marco974

New member
Hello everyone, we have a Ricoh c9100 for 6 months.
In general it is an exceptional printer but has big problems if there are images or grayscale areas. The quality of grays is very bad (you have to turn these areas into cmyk to get a good result). Do you have this problem too? I ask you why the technicians in Italy tell me that it is a known problem and for now there are no solutions. Thanks if you have time to answer me.
 

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