Thicker than 350gsm Business Cards with Color Edge

jpfulton248

Well-known member
I have a customer asking for a quote on extremely thick business cards (in the 16pt-26pt range) with color edge. How is this done? I think the edge is just painted on, right? Or is that the workaround way of doing it? And then I think I read that the thick cards are done multi-ply but how exactly? If anyone can help with this I'd appreciate it much.

Thanks!
 
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pippip

Well-known member
We do low volume triple ply, two sheets of lightweight card printed single sided and spray mounted onto each side of a coloured card. Just good old fashioned manual labour spraying and positioning. Works well.
You can get glue roller applicator machines if you do more volume and even double sided label sheets, but they're costly.

I've seen threads on here for colour edge cards with basically spray painting the sides of the block of cards in a clamp.
 

jpfulton248

Well-known member
We do low volume triple ply, two sheets of lightweight card printed single sided and spray mounted onto each side of a coloured card. Just good old fashioned manual labour spraying and positioning. Works well.
You can get glue roller applicator machines if you do more volume and even double sided label sheets, but they're costly.

I've seen threads on here for colour edge cards with basically spray painting the sides of the block of cards in a clamp.
Stupid questions: Print first, then glue then cut? What kind of spray glue?
 

pippip

Well-known member
Yes, print first, make sure printed dead centre as you'll be flipping one of the sheets so aligning opposite sides.
I use 3M Display mount but normal spray mount works fine to.

It's messy stuff, when I can I actually spray outside and bring the sheet indoors to place as needs a few seconds to activate anyway.
 

akalaray

Well-known member
I have a customer asking for a quote on extremely thick business cards (in the 16pt-26pt range) with color edge. How is this done? I think the edge is just painted on, right? Or is that the workaround way of doing it? And then I think I read that the thick cards are done multi-ply but how exactly? If anyone can help with this I'd appreciate it much.

Thanks!
https://convertiblesolutions.com/multiloft
We use this all the time - colored center card
 

thommac

New member
We print business cards on 32pt, then cut and mount them in a clamp type device and then air brush the edges on a kind of lazy Susan.
 

Magnus59

Well-known member
We do 2 ply and 3 ply cards using double sided tape that we buy in 44" wide rolls, we have a jig set up to make up the press sheets after printing, then guillotine after the sheets are glued together.
 

PricelineNegotiator

Well-known member
I talked with Mohawk earlier today at their booth. They have an exclusive partnership with Moo for their cookie-cutter product, pressure activated glued one side sheets. We can buy the sheets in a Superfine Eggshell finish, in either an ultra white or white, but the colored in-between sheet (glue two sides) is only being manufactured by Mohawk for Moo.

If you are looking to paint an edge I think you can get a low cost paint spray machine and just plug in whatever type of color you need. I've heard that's the way to go.
 

bill kahny

Well-known member
We print business cards on 32pt, then cut and mount them in a clamp type device and then air brush the edges on a kind of lazy Susan.
Would you share a picture of you "lazy susan" I tried building one myself but am not very happy with the clamping system.
 

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