Canon C10000VP VS Ricoh 9200

slimbh

Well-known member
Hi,
We are still looking for changing our KM C1085 machine.
Ricoh 9200 seem to be very reliable machine, also Canon C10000VP.
So what do you think? with is more reliable, with one had cost per page less?
Need some machine user review.
Thanks,
 

Digital Insight

Well-known member
I looked at both

The CANON is a POWER HOG

Needs TWO 50AMP legs.

100 AMPS?!?!?! Crazy.......

CANON also has TWO "fuser" units in it.

Hard enough to keep 1 fuser in good shape. Good luck dealing with 2....


Had my 9200 for about 7 months now.

It's a nice machine.
 
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kdw75

Well-known member
I can't speak to the reliability of either machine you mentioned, but would two 7210s work? We have two Ricoh's 7210s and it is great having the reliability and interchangeability between the two.

Just a thought.
 

cqb1988

Member
I looked at both

The CANON is a POWER HOG

Needs TWO 50AMP legs.

100 AMPS?!?!?! Crazy.......

CANON also has TWO "fuser" units in it.

Hard enough to keep 1 fuser in good shape. Good luck dealing with 2....


Had my 9200 for about 7 months now.

It's a nice machine.
canon needs a 208 3phase 30a plus a 208 single-phase 20a, Ricoh needs 2 208v single phase 30a. shouldn't be a big factor. i would choose ricoh over canon du faster, cheaper, and handles heavier media.
 

slimbh

Well-known member
Should we chose machine only on electric consumption ???
What about heavy media handling?
What about cost per page?
What about consumable life?
What about fuser heavy duty capability?

We have two KM C1085 machine, and we decide to change brand because of fuser always issue (we print 90% heavy weight material) and because of monthly print capacity has been exceed.
Thanks
 

Digital Insight

Well-known member
Do you seriously want to DEAL with a machine (CANON) that has TWO fuser units??

That ALONE is ENOUGH to stay away from that box.

And, YES "power consumption" is a BIG DEAL

I guess you get you power for "free"

We don't.......
 

AP90

Well-known member
Do you seriously want to DEAL with a machine (CANON) that has TWO fuser units??

That ALONE is ENOUGH to stay away from that box.

And, YES "power consumption" is a BIG DEAL

I guess you get you power for "free"

We don't.......
Honestly, power consumption shouldn't be a deal breaker when considering a machine of this caliber. Your looking at what, maybe $100/month at most in power consumption. I know when we installed our Xerox 1000i we thought it was going to spike our utilities bill. Ended up costing around $10/month to run. Didn't even factor the cost in.

Also, I don't see what the problem of 2 fusers is. Do you just have a machine that chews through fusers like its nobody's job? We go months without having to replace fuser parts. Thats like saying you shouldn't have more than 1 printer because, well, 2 fusers.
 

Digital Insight

Well-known member
Months between fuser "service" ???

Months???


What volume are you running. 15k a month?

ANY production machine running "production" VOLUME is going to see FUSER maintenance AT LEAST every 4-6 weeks.

Minimum.

And $100 bucks a month is the "max" you think a machine can eat?

Guess you never ran an IGEN.......

Try more like $1,200 a month for that machine and the "chillers"


Facts hurt.
 

AP90

Well-known member
Months between fuser "service" ???

Months???

What volume are you running. 15k a month?

ANY production machine running "production" VOLUME is going to see FUSER maintenance AT LEAST every 4-6 weeks.

Minimum.

And $100 bucks a month is the "max" you think a machine can eat?

Guess you never ran an IGEN.......

Try more like $1,200 a month for that machine and the "chillers"


Facts hurt.
We run about 180k/month on our Versant 3100. Pretty good production numbers. We are probably on 3 months right now of the same fuser and its components. If I had to call service every 4-6 weeks for fuser maintenance, id be looking at a different printer. Hell, we don't see maintenance for a month or 2 sometimes for any problem. Mind you this is on a 3100 with 4+ million clicks.

True, I haven't ever ran an iGen. But I have no clue what running an iGen and how much an iGen would cost has any relevance to this conversation. I also haven't ran a 10 color KBA 105 but I'm sure it eats a ton of power. Your point?

Most of these digital presses are pretty energy efficient. Unlike the iGen. But once again, the iGen is as irrelevant as the KBA 105 I mentioned.
 

namelessentity

Well-known member
I'm not a massive fan of my 10k, but all your weird power concerns and fuser issues are extremely baseless. The fusers almost never need much of any maintenance, and if they do the tech usually has a spare on hand and will swap them and do a rebuild in his own time. We run 100+ cover stock with heavy coverage almost exclusively, so we push the machine pretty hard.

That said, the specs on the Ricoh seem better, and I feel like Canon dropped the ball a bit on the 10k. It seemed like everyone else could do 400gsm and printed nicer on textured media.
 

SoggyWinter

Well-known member
I'm thinking of getting a 10k to replace a Xrx V3100 that is problematic. What issues has your team had? thanks.


I'm not a massive fan of my 10k, but all your weird power concerns and fuser issues are extremely baseless. The fusers almost never need much of any maintenance, and if they do the tech usually has a spare on hand and will swap them and do a rebuild in his own time. We run 100+ cover stock with heavy coverage almost exclusively, so we push the machine pretty hard.

That said, the specs on the Ricoh seem better, and I feel like Canon dropped the ball a bit on the 10k. It seemed like everyone else could do 400gsm and printed nicer on textured media.
 
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gregbatch

Well-known member
The Ricoh can run on heavily textured stock with no problem. Heavy linen, felts and even Classic Columns. If you want to do work that typically requires offset, the Ricoh will do the job.
 

namelessentity

Well-known member
I'm thinking of getting a 10k to replace a Xrx V3100 that is problematic. What issues has your team had? thanks.
It goes down a lot for really annoying things. Like random heat sensors, belts will wander off and cause the machine to code out. Certain gears are prone to fail. It prints very poorly on textured media, even with voltage adjustments. I feel like I see a tech at least once every 2 weeks at a minimum. As of right now it's down because of a faulty thermistor, which is why it was down a week and a half ago as well.
I like it when it's working, but I feel like it never comes close to meeting the duty cycle advertised.
On the plus side, our sales guy and techs really are great, and they do everything in their power to make things right.
 

Barrybw

Member
I replaced 2 Canon 10000's 7 months ago with 2 Konica C-6100's I am please with them. Much better control using the IQ-501 color and registration controller.
 

kevneto

Member
I have a C10000 and will never get another. For a 3rd/4th generation machine it is not very reliable. And the 2 fusers will cook a sheet causing "bricking" when you send to stacker. Constant image problems.We went with the Ricoh 9210. Much more robust beast so far and 36% faster. In addition, the operator can replace drums, fusers and other parts for better uptime. Canon needs to up their game
 
The Ricoh c9200 isn't garbage and stands up well against any digital machine and is half the price. A Ricoh c9200 and a Ricoh c7200SX covers every angle (media latitude/CMYK+) and you still have cash in your pocket against one Iridesse (the best Xerox product).
 

azehnali

Member
when you can have a xerox versant 2100 with 22 million prints on it and running then you can say ricoh isnt garbage
 

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