Intec SC6000 / Morgana ColorCut Digital Die Cutter

jwheeler

Well-known member
I know @criccidisk did a write up on the SC5000 a while back. We acquired the SC6000 about a while ago and have used it quite a bit already for boxes, labels, and die-cut postcards, folders, etc, so I wanted to post my feedback for others who are considering one. There are 3 units in the lineup: SC5000, SC6000, and now the SC6500 and you can see an overview of the slight differences between each unit on Intec's website at this link. Plockmatic also sells these units under the Morgana name of ColorCut here.

TLDR: We like it and would recommend it. We would prefer a flatbed conveyor model if we had the room and the budget. (Price ~$13,000US vs. ~$40,000US for flatbed)

PROS:
  • Great price for what it can do
  • Very small foot print. The catch tray even completely folds into the unit when not in use
  • Uses a standard power outlet
  • Large, auto feeding tray that is quick and easy to setup and has been quite reliable
  • Accurate and consistent cutting
  • Similar to a slitter/cutter/creaser: once you set it, you can pretty much walk away and come back to a finished stack.
  • Easy to setup jobs in both the software and at the machine.
    • You need to do a quick depth/pressure check when trying new stocks whether for creasing, kiss cutting, or die cutting. The touch screen makes this process very fast and you can save the settings under the stock name for future use.
    • The software doesn't require specially named spot colors for the die lines. You just make them 100% C, M, Y, or K...or R, G or B, then assign to a task in the software.
    • There's a plugin for Illustrator that automatically adds the necessary registration marks and barcode to your AI file, then automatically opens this file in the cutting software.
    • We opted for the automatic box making software. This is fantastic! They have over a dozen pre-made box patterns that you can adjust to any length, width, or height and it automatically opens in Illustrator for you to add the artwork, then automatically opens in the cutting software to begin the finishing.
CONS:
  • It must be plugged in directly to a PC via a printer cable...can't be put on the network.
  • Long sheets do not work well. The feeder extends out just fine to handle sheets up to 13"x28" long. However, the catch tray doesn't extend. Therefore, the longer sheets end up just tumbling onto the floor if you're not standing there to catch every one of them. We were trying to make these single sheet presentation folders in house. It did a great job cutting them consistently, but it was frustrating that they just fell on the floor.
  • Due to the feed-through design, rather than cutting on a flatbed, you run into issues with the die cut pieces getting caught up in the rollers. The machine sort of has a mind of it's own and does what it thinks will be the best pattern. To overcome this, the software does allow you some control over which end or corner of the sheet to start with, and you can also make more little tabs to hold the die-cut pieces in a little better. It just takes some trial and error, but that can be a bit tedious.
  • I agree with @criccidisk that the creasing isn't too great - and this is probably the weakest point of this machine:
    • It's really more of a score than a crease because it's just a small ball bearing rolling over the sheet into a felt pad on the back.
    • It doesn't do too great on really thick sheets since the indenting only comes from one side; there isn't a male/female side like in a true crease.
    • We have a client that needs manilla folders with printing on the inside and outside. This job has always been a nightmare to run through our Konica's since we have to purchase and run them pre-cut. However, now we can run them on flat sheets and just die-cut them afterwards. The cutting is excellent, but the creasing for the center fold is weak.
    • You MUST laminate if you want to make boxes, or they will crack.
  • You must leave little tabs on die-cut pieces so they don't fall out as it runs the sheet through the rollers. This creates more manual work when punching out the finished pieces, and sometimes you get little torn edges. A flatbed die cutter doesn't need the little tabs and the pieces just fall right out, clean every time
 
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Is it crazy that I drool over print finishing equipment instead of cars like a normal person.
  • What machine do you use for laminating?
  • Do you just laminate one side or both sides?
  • I wonder what that flatbed conveyor model costs?
 
@tngcas We have the KM AccurioShine which is really meant for foiling onto toner, but also has the ability to laminate. However, I would not recommend that machine because it does not have the ability to slit between the sheets. We’re only using it to get us by until we get a better dedicated laminating unit.

You only need to laminate the outside of the boxes to eliminate the cracking, but I’m sure it would help strengthen them if you did the inside too.

The flatbed was in the $40k range.
 
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That's insane, it is a saga ASF420 rebrand. I was offered a little over 10k USD directly from the Alibaba reseller last year, I bought an iecho PK from them for 7.8k USD.
Whoa!! This intec was more than double your iecho unit!! Was it used? I’ve never heard of that brand though. Must not be sold here in the US. Was the software included in that price?
 
Whoa!! This intec was more than double your iecho unit!! Was it used? I’ve never heard of that brand though. Must not be sold here in the US. Was the software included in that price?
That's the price you import directly from the original manufacturer from China, all brand new. Saga has plugins for ai, cdr. The paid option software is developed by Intec I think.

The one you have was about 5k which isn't too bad, 300%markup is normal for these rebranded machines. I just can't believe that morgana flatbed is 60k, and it is an older model that has no bottom mark reader.
 
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That's the price you import directly from the original manufacturer from China, all brand new. Saga has plugins for ai, cdr. The paid option software is developed by Intec I think.

The one you have was about 5k which isn't too bad, 300%markup is normal for these rebranded machines. I just can't believe that morgana flatbed is 60k, and it is an older model that has no bottom mark reader.
You can pickup a 5x5ft Summa or Colex flatbed with creasing, cutting, and vaccuum holddown for around $60k if you time the promotions well.
 
you recommend the SC6000 for its affordability, compact design, and efficient cutting capabilities. However, you note limitations with long sheets, creasing quality, and the need for manual adjustments in certain scenarios.
 
you recommend the SC6000 for its affordability, compact design, and efficient cutting capabilities. However, you note limitations with long sheets, creasing quality, and the need for manual adjustments in certain scenarios.

Sticker kiss cutting may be ok...
 
I know @criccidisk did a write up on the SC5000 a while back. We acquired the SC6000 about a while ago and have used it quite a bit already for boxes, labels, and die-cut postcards, folders, etc, so I wanted to post my feedback for others who are considering one. There are 3 units in the lineup: SC5000, SC6000, and now the SC6500 and you can see an overview of the slight differences between each unit on Intec's website at this link. Plockmatic also sells these units under the Morgana name of ColorCut here.

TLDR: We like it and would recommend it. We would prefer a flatbed conveyor model if we had the room and the budget.

PROS:
  • Great price for what it can do
  • Very small foot print. The catch tray even completely folds into the unit when not in use
  • Uses a standard power outlet
  • Large, auto feeding tray that is quick and easy to setup and has been quite reliable
  • Accurate and consistent cutting
  • Similar to a slitter/cutter/creaser: once you set it, you can pretty much walk away and come back to a finished stack.
  • Easy to setup jobs in both the software and at the machine.
    • You need to do a quick depth/pressure check when trying new stocks whether for creasing, kiss cutting, or die cutting. The touch screen makes this process very fast and you can save the settings under the stock name for future use.
    • The software doesn't require specially named spot colors for the die lines. You just make them 100% C, M, Y, or K...or R, G or B, then assign to a task in the software.
    • There's a plugin for Illustrator that automatically adds the necessary registration marks and barcode to your AI file, then automatically opens this file in the cutting software.
    • We opted for the automatic box making software. This is fantastic! They have over a dozen pre-made box patterns that you can adjust to any length, width, or height and it automatically opens in Illustrator for you to add the artwork, then automatically opens in the cutting software to begin the finishing.
CONS:
  • It must be plugged in directly to a PC via a printer cable...can't be put on the network.
  • Long sheets do not work well. The feeder extends out just fine to handle sheets up to 13"x28" long. However, the catch tray doesn't extend. Therefore, the longer sheets end up just tumbling onto the floor if you're not standing there to catch every one of them. We were trying to make these single sheet presentation folders in house. It did a great job cutting them consistently, but it was frustrating that they just fell on the floor.
  • Due to the feed-through design, rather than cutting on a flatbed, you run into issues with the die cut pieces getting caught up in the rollers. The machine sort of has a mind of it's own and does what it thinks will be the best pattern. To overcome this, the software does allow you some control over which end or corner of the sheet to start with, and you can also make more little tabs to hold the die-cut pieces in a little better. It just takes some trial and error, but that can be a bit tedious.
  • I agree with @criccidisk that the creasing isn't too great - and this is probably the weakest point of this machine:
    • It's really more of a score than a crease because it's just a small ball bearing rolling over the sheet into a felt pad on the back.
    • It doesn't do too great on really thick sheets since the indenting only comes from one side; there isn't a male/female side like in a true crease.
    • We have a client that needs manilla folders with printing on the inside and outside. This job has always been a nightmare to run through our Konica's since we have to purchase and run them pre-cut. However, now we can run them on flat sheets and just die-cut them afterwards. The cutting is excellent, but the creasing for the center fold is weak.
    • You MUST laminate if you want to make boxes, or they will crack.
  • You must leave little tabs on die-cut pieces so they don't fall out as it runs the sheet through the rollers. This creates more manual work when punching out the finished pieces, and sometimes you get little torn edges. A flatbed die cutter doesn't need the little tabs and the pieces just fall right out, clean every time

Thanks. I almost bought an SC6500, but the creasing handicap would have killed 1/2 of my intended use. I'd imagine these machines are great for short run stickers though.
 
Thanks. I almost bought an SC6500, but the creasing handicap would have killed 1/2 of my intended use. I'd imagine these machines are great for short run stickers though.
Yes, we've already made lots of stickers - both kiss-cut and cut-out. We find the cutting to be much more consistent than our Roland in both cases, and they are much easier to punch out. However, the digital vinyl 12x18 sheets (that we've found) are quite a bit more expensive than the roll vinyl media.
 
@jwheeler I wonder if you ever got a quote from intec for their flatbed model (the current model is the FB9000PRO). We have the FB8000PRO Mk3 and we bought it just before the FB9000PRO came out hence we got it for about £6k. Last time I checked the FB9000PRO was about £12k.

I will preface this with we have not yet used our FB8000PRO due to space limitations but could not pass up the deal when it was available. Our current machine for die cutting stickers is the Intec LC600 and I absolutely love this machine. We've had the LC600 for about 3 years now and it's never skipped a beat. I do intend to buy either the SC5000 or the SC6500 this year to use alongside our FB8000PRO as I am a huge fan of Inter machines now.
 
@jwheeler I wonder if you ever got a quote from intec for their flatbed model (the current model is the FB9000PRO). We have the FB8000PRO Mk3 and we bought it just before the FB9000PRO came out hence we got it for about £6k. Last time I checked the FB9000PRO was about £12k.

I will preface this with we have not yet used our FB8000PRO due to space limitations but could not pass up the deal when it was available. Our current machine for die cutting stickers is the Intec LC600 and I absolutely love this machine. We've had the LC600 for about 3 years now and it's never skipped a beat. I do intend to buy either the SC5000 or the SC6500 this year to use alongside our FB8000PRO as I am a huge fan of Inter machines now.
We did, but it was too costly for the limited amount we use it to justify, and took up too much floor space. We will be getting a 2nd building space soon, so if the workload picks up for that machine, then we might consider the flatbed in the future.

I’m always amazed at the prices you guys are quoting from other countries. Perhaps it’s because of the import costs to the USA or since we’re buying through a reseller/dealer rather than directly from the manufacturer.
 
We did, but it was too costly for the limited amount we use it to justify, and took up too much floor space. We will be getting a 2nd building space soon, so if the workload picks up for that machine, then we might consider the flatbed in the future.

I’m always amazed at the prices you guys are quoting from other countries. Perhaps it’s because of the import costs to the USA or since we’re buying through a reseller/dealer rather than directly from the manufacturer.
Yeah I know what you mean. I always grew up wanting to move to the US but when I look at equipment prices in the printing industry, I'm so glad I'm in the UK :ROFLMAO:
 
I got a brand named RUK, the model MKC-0806L last year, with creasing wheel, kiss-cut tool, universal cut tool and oscillating cut tool total 10K . Pretty good till now. Smart and intelligent. Cutting size 800mm*600mm sticker, corrugated box, white box, pvc board. Pretty good, really love it.
 

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